Black Death

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - History - 203 pages
6 Reviews
A fascinating work of detective history, The Black Death traces the causes and far-reaching consequences of this infamous outbreak of plague that spread across the continent of Europe from 1347 to 1351. Drawing on sources as diverse as monastic manuscripts and dendrochronological studies (which measure growth rings in trees), historian Robert S. Gottfried demonstrates how a bacillus transmitted by rat fleas brought on an ecological reign of terror -- killing one European in three, wiping out entire villages and towns, and rocking the foundation of medieval society and civilization.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

"The Black Death" is approachable, contains a lot of interesting stories which put the plague in context, and is informative. I was a little surprised at how much I liked it. Some of its more ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is not very easy to understand, but because it is about nice stuff like dying, i would recommend it 12+ because it is not to easy to understand.

Contents

A Natural History of Plague
1
The European Environment 10501347
16
Chapter3 The Plagues Beginnings
33
The Plagues Progress
54
The Immediate Consequences
77
The Stirrings of Modern Medicine
104
Disease and the Transformation of Medieval Europe
129
Europes Environmental Crisis
161
Notes
164
A Bibliographical Essay
187
Index
195
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About the author (2010)

Robert S. Gottfried is Professor of History and Director of Medieval Studies at Rutgers University. Among his other books is Epidemic Disease in Fifteenth Century England.

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