Book Commissioning and Acquisition

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 180 pages
2 Reviews
Since its first publication, this essential guide to book commissioning has established itself as the one and only 'must-read' for any successful editor, and the core training text used both within publishing houses and on publishing courses worldwide.
In this new edition, Davies concentrates on the essential skills of commissioning, as well as other editorial challenges such as handling new lists following mergers and takeovers, and the demands of digital technology. New case-studies have been added which illustrate the commercial and practical problems that editors must address in today's complex and demanding marketplace.
This book remains the one text that editors must have by their side throughout their careers.
 

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Review: Book Commissioning and Acquisition

User Review  - Drucilla - Goodreads

On the plus side, this book explains everything you'd want to know about being an editor and acquiring books. It uses clear and consise language along with examples to make sure the reader understands ... Read full review

Review: Book Commissioning and Acquisition

User Review  - Marte Patel - Goodreads

Thorough, useful, relevant and inspiring. A very good book on best practice within commissioning and list management. Recommended. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The route to becoming an editor
5
Structure of the book
9
Terminology
10
One size fits all?
12
How to choose what to publish
13
How authors select publishers
14
How editors select authors
16
Writing blurbs
91
Formfilling
92
Copublications
93
Briefing designers
95
Liaison with marketing
99
Publication day
104
Dealing with inappropriate behaviour
106
Case studies
109

Context for choosing
17
True commissioning work
18
Evaluating books and projects
19
The publishing list
21
Readership
22
Competition
25
Using advisers
26
Seeking advice from colleagues
28
Working with agents
30
Intuition versus facts
33
Case studies
37
Committing projects for publication
39
The written submission
40
Profit and loss account
42
Accuracy in length and delivery
44
The contract
48
Rights
51
Common areas of misjudgement
52
Case Study
56
From contract to delivery
59
System for the progress chasing
61
Safe scheduling
63
Providing appropriate author support
64
Planning ahead for delivery date
66
Slippage
71
Conflict between authors
74
Conflict between author and editor
75
Dealing with unsatisfactory writing
77
Case studies
81
Managing the publication process
83
Explaining the publication process to the author
84
Examination of typescripts
85
Liaison with subeditorial and production
89
Strategic and financial aspects of list building
111
Frontlist versus backlist
114
Dominating the market
115
Marketing factors
116
Cost factors
117
Problem areas in list development
120
Conclusion
124
Developing and maintaining a list
127
Developing an established list
128
Developing a list as a competitive tool
130
The backlist
132
Reprinting
134
Neglecting the backlist
137
Putting books out of print
138
Case studies
139
Teamwork and professional ethics
143
Inhouse teamwork
144
Working with authors
147
Bad behaviour
149
Case study
151
An impossible job?
153
Inheriting other editors lists
154
Managing email
157
Fear of failure
158
Dark days
162
The best job?
163
A future for the book?
165
The example of CD Roms
167
In conclusion
168
Recommended reading and other resources
171
Index
173
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Gill Davies worked in publishing for 26 years and became one of the leading academic publishers in her field. She held three managing directorships in that time since beginning work in publishing as an editorial secretary, and worked in New York for two years. She was the first woman to be elected Chair of the Council of Academic Publishing at the Publishers' Association of Great Britain. Professor Gill Davies is now Director of the MA in Book Publishing at the London College of Communication. She also provides training on courses for young editors run by the Publishing Training Centre and other organisations.

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