History of Ceylon: Presented by Captain John Ribeyro to the King of Portugal, in 1685

Front Cover
Government Press, 1847 - Portugal - 278 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 156 - Ceylon, was the usual term of their navigation, and it was in those markets that the merchants from the more remote countries of Asia expected their arrival. The return of the fleet of Egypt was fixed to the months of December or January; and as soon as their rich cargo had been transported on the backs of camels from the Red Sea to the Nile, and had descended that river as far as Alexandria, it was poured, without delay, into the capital of the empire.
Page 161 - ... assist, defend, and protect the subjects of the King of Portugal, in those parts, from the power and invasion of the States of the United Provinces; the King of Portugal, with the advice and consent of His Council, doth give, transfer, and by these Presents, grant and confirm unto the King of Great Britain, His heirs and successors, for ever, the Port and Island of...
Page 235 - The selling or giving away the smallest quantity of cinnamon (even were it but a single stick), the exporting, of it, the peeling of the bark, extracting the oil either from that or the leaves, or the camphor from the roots, except by the servants of...
Page 156 - Egypt was fixed to the months of December or January; and as soon as their rich cargo had been transported on the backs of camels from the Red Sea to the Nile, and had descended that river as far as Alexandria, it was poured without del:iy into the capital of the empire. The objects of oriental traffic...
Page 269 - Buddhu, and of this the learned priests are fully aware ; but they do not attempt to correct the error, regarding the subject as too difficult to be understood by the unlearned. His doctrine is that of a series of existences, which he illustrates by the metaphors of a tree and a lamp. A tree produces fruit, from which fruit another tree is produced, and so the series continues. The last tree is not the identical tree with the first, but it is a result, so that if the first tree had not been, the...
Page 270 - According to this doctrine, the present body and soul of man never had a previous existence ; but a previously existent being, under the influence of desire, performed virtuous or vicious actions : and in consequence of this, upon the death of that individual, a new body and soul is produced. The metaphor of the lamp is similar : one lamp is lighted from another ; the two lamps are distinct, but the one would not have been lighted had not the other existed.
Page 157 - At the spot where the seven hundred men, with the king at their head, exhausted by (sea) sickness, and faint from weakness, had landed out of the vessel, supporting themselves on the palms of their hands pressed on the ground, they sat themselves down. Hence to them the name of ' Tambapanniyo,' (copper-palmed, from the colour of the soil). From this circumstance that wilderness obtained the name of
Page 156 - The coast of Malabar, or the island of Ceylon,'" was the usual term of their navigation, and it was in those markets that the merchants from the more remote countries of Asia expected their arrivaL...
Page 156 - ... and a variety of aromatics, that were consumed in religious worship and the pomp of funerals. The labour and risk of the voyage was rewarded with almost incredible profit; but the profit was made upon Roman subjects, and a few individuals were enriched at the expense of the public. As the...
Page 269 - ... of Buddha, and of this the learned priests are fully aware, but they do not attempt to correct the error, regarding the subject as too difficult to be understood by the unlearned. His doctrine is that of a series of existences, which he illustrates by the metaphors of a tree and of a lamp.

Bibliographic information