MEMOIR ON THE BOUNDARY QUESTION PENDING BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC OF COSTA RICA

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Page 31 - The contracting parties in this convention engage to invite every state with which both or either have friendly intercourse, to enter into stipulations with them similar to those which they have entered into with each other ; to the end that all...
Page 31 - States may share in the honour and advantage of having contributed to a work of such general interest and importance as the canal herein contemplated ; and the Contracting Parties likewise agree that each shall enter into Treaty stipulations with such of the Central American States as they may deem advisable, for the purpose of more effectually carrying out the great design of this Convention, namely, that of constructing and maintaining the said canal as a ship communication between the two oceans...
Page 14 - The internal sovereignty of a State does not, in any degree, depend upon its recognition by other States. A new State, springing into existence, does not require the recognition of other States to confirm its internal sovereignty. The existence of the State de facto is sufficient, in this respect, to establish its sovereignty de jure. It is a State because it exists. Thus the internal sovereignty of the United States of America was complete from the time they declared themselves " free, sovereign,...
Page 31 - ... between the two oceans, for the benefit of mankind, on equal terms to all, and of protecting the same; and they also agree that the good offices of either shall be employed, when requested by the other, in aiding and assisting the negotiation of such treaty stipulations; and should any differences arise as to right or property over the territory through which the said canal shall pass, between the States or Governments of Central America, and such differences should in any way impede or obstruct...
Page 31 - And the contracting parties likewise agree that each shall enter into treaty stipulations with such of the Central American States as they may deem advisable for the purpose of more effectually carrying out the great design of this convention, namely, that of constructing and maintaining the said canal as a ship communication between the two oceans, for the benefit of mankind, on equal terms to all. and of protecting the same ; and they also agree that the good offices of either shall be employed,...
Page 31 - States may share in the honor and advantage of having contributed to a work of such general interest and importance as the Canal herein contemplated. And the contracting parties likewise agree that, each shall enter into Treaty stipulations with such of the Central American States, as they may deem advisable, for the purpose of more effectually carrying out the great design of this Convention...
Page 14 - Law," (a) gives the following definitions of what constitutes a State. " Sovereignty is acquired by a State, either at the origin of the society of which it is composed, or when it separates itself from the community of which it previously formed a part and on which it was dependent.
Page 9 - Ocean, from north to south, about 60 leagues. Its limit, on the Atlantic, is from the mouth of the River San Juan to the little island called the Escudo de Veraguas; and on the Pacific, from the river Alvarado, the boundary of the province of Nicaragua, to the River Boruca, which terminates the kingdom of Terra Firma to the westward.
Page 10 - ART. 15. The territory of the State is now extended, from west to east, from the River Salto, which divides it from Nicaragua to the River Chiriqui, the end of the Republic of Colombia; and north-south from one sea to the other, its limits on the north being at the mouth of the River San Juan and the Escudo JS48— 3 de Veragua, and on the south at the outlet of the River Alvarado and that of Chiriqui.
Page 9 - Rica. // extends from the river Salto, which separates it from Nicaragua, to the district of Chiriqui, in the jurisdiction of Veraguas, a distance of 160 leagues from West to East; and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from North to South, about 60 leagues.

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