Kuby Immunology

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Macmillan, 2007 - Medical - 574 pages
9 Reviews
The only textbook written for undergraduates by teachers of the course, this bestseller presents the most current concepts in an experimental context, conveying the excitement of scientific discovery, and highlighting important advances while providing unsurpassed pedagogical support for the first-time learner.  The new edition is thoroughly updated, including most notably the new chapter on innate immunity.
 

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The best book for immunology. I teach immunology at university, hence has to consult no of text and reference books. Believe me This book by Kuby is the best one, its illustrations, figures and language is simply superb...............A layman can even understand immunology if he consult this book..  

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great book about immunology

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Contents

Overview of the Immune System
1
Cells and Organs of the Immune System
23
Natural Killer Cells
24
Early Vaccination Studies Led the Way to Immunology 2 Cells of the Immune System
30
Collaboration between Innate and Adaptive Granulolytic Cells
37
The Major Histocompatibility Molecules Bind Comparisons
49
Innate Immunity
52
CLINICAL FOCUS ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA
55
NK Cells and T Cells Share Some Features
361
CTL Activity Can Be Demonstrated by CML
367
Hypersensitivity Reactions
371
IgEMediated Type 1 Hypersensitivity
373
90
376
Several Pharmacologic Agents Mediate
379
CLINICAL FOCUS THE GENETICS OF ASTHMA
386
The Immune System in Health and Disease 16 Tolerance and Autoimmunity
401

Soluble Molecules and MembraneAssociated
59
Cell Types of Innate Immunity
65
Ubiquity of Innate Immunity
71
PART Generation of BCell and TCell Responses 4 Antigens and Antibodies
76
Haptens Are Valuable Research and Diagnostic
77
Basic Structure of Antibodies
84
Idiotype
101
Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes
111
Organization and Expression
113
LightChain DNA Undergoes VJ Rearrangements
117
There Are Numerous GermLine V
123
Expression of Ig Genes
130
Antibody Genes and Antibody Engineering
136
Principles and Applications
145
Precipitation Reactions
151
Western Blotting
158
Immunoelectron Microscopy
164
The Complement System
168
The Classical Pathway Begins with
170
The Three Complement Pathways Converge
175
Cleavage Products of Complement Components
182
The Major Histocompatibility Complex and Antigen Presentation
189
The Major Histocompatibility
190
The ExonIntron Arrangement of Class I and Il
196
The Human Class I Region Spans about 2000
202
TCell Receptor
223
TCRVariableRegion Genes Rearrange
229
Rearranged TCR Genes Are Assembled from
231
Affinity of TCR for PeptideMHC Complexes
238
TCell Maturation Activation and Differentiation
245
Some Central Issues in Thymic Selection
251
How Many TCR Complexes Must Be Engaged
258
Cell Death and TCell Populations
264
BCell Generation Activation and Differentiation
271
Experimental Animal Methods
277
SelfReactive B Cells May Be Rescued by Editing
278
T Helper Cells Play a Critical Role in
290
Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells Are Generated
296
Immune Effector Mechanisms 12 Cytokines
302
Cytokine Receptors Fall within Five Families
308
Cytokine Antagonists
314
Chagass Disease Is Caused by a Parasite
320
Leukocyte Activation and Migration
327
Lymphocyte Recirculation
334
HEVLike Structures Appear
346
89
349
CellMediated Cytotoxic Responses
351
General Principles of Effector T Cells
352
Establishment and Maintenance of Tolerance
402
by Stimulating or Blocking AutoAntibodies
409
Release of Sequestered Antigens
415
CLINICAL FOCUS WHY ARE WOMEN MORE
416
208
422
Transplantation Immunology
425
CellMediated Graft Rejection Occurs
431
92
435
209
436
Antibodies Can Suppress Graft Rejection Responses
437
210
446
Immune Response to Infectious Diseases
447
Immune Response
449
93
454
Bacterial Infections
455
Two Species of Trypanosoma Cause
462
Diseases May Reemerge for Various Reasons
467
Vaccines
475
CHALLENGES IN
476
Inactivated or KilledVaccines
484
AIDS and Other Immunodeficiencies
493
AIDS and Other
495
Complement Defects Result in Immunodeficiency
502
The Retrovirus HIV1 is the Causative Agent
508
Cancer and the Immune System
525
Tumor Antigens
531
Tumors Can Induce Potent Immune Responses
537
Experimental Systems
546
Inbred Strains Can Reduce Experimental Variation
547
XRay Crystallography Provides
553
Southern Blotting Detects DNA of a Given Sequence
559
CD Antigens
3
Cytokines A27
29
Glossary
37
Answers AN1
1
151
2
336
4
152
8
101
9
229
10
451
11
403
13
175
16
457
17
410
19
539
22
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Thomas J. Kindt, National Institutes of Health, is the Director of the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, which places him in daily contact with the cutting edge of experimental and clinical immunology. As head of the Immunogenetics Research Section, Tom's research interests include the study of retroviral infections in animal models.

Richard A. Goldsby, Amherst College, is a member of the department of Biology at Amherst College. His research interests include the somatic mutation of antibody genes in the generation of antibody diversity. Since the 1980s, he has served as a Course Director in the National Science Foundation-Chatauqua Short Course Program for the education of college teachers, annually presenting a course on current advances in immunology.

Barbara A. Osborne, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, is a recognized contributor to the fast-moving area of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. A highly active researcher, Barbara also teaches immunology to undergraduate and graduate students.

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