The Life of Robert E. Lee for Boys and Girls

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Houghton Mifflin, 1917 - 209 pages
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Page 167 - I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit : " Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy...
Page 175 - By the terms of the agreement officers and men can return to their homes, and remain there until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection. With an increasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. RE LEE,...
Page 168 - The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.
Page 190 - He was a foe without hate ; a friend without treachery ; a soldier without cruelty; я victor without oppression, and a victim without murmuring. He was a public officer without vices ; a private citizen without wrong ; a neighbor without reproach ; a Christian without hypocrisy, and a man without guile, lie was Csesar, without his ambition ; Frederick, without his tyranny ; Napoleon, without his selfishness, and Washington, without his reward.
Page 131 - There have, however, been instances of forgetfulness on the part of some that they have in keeping the yet unsullied reputation of the army, and that the duties exacted of us by civilization and Christianity are not less obligatory in the country of the enemy than in our own.
Page 163 - The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed.
Page 175 - After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard-fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last, that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them; but, feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that would...
Page 101 - When the constitution was adopted by the votes of states at Philadelphia and accepted by votes of states in popular conventions it was safe to say there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton on the one side, to George Clinton and George Mason, on the other, who regarded the new system as anything but an experiment entered upon by the states, and from which each and every state had the right to peaceably withdraw — a right which was very likely to be exercised.
Page 131 - It must be remembered that we make war only upon armed men, and that we cannot take vengeance for the wrongs our people have suffered without lowering ourselves in the eyes of all whose abhorrence has been excited by the atrocities of our enemy, without offending against Him to whom vengeance belongeth, without whose favor and support our efforts must all prove in vain.
Page 104 - Tell Custis* he must consult his own judgment, reason, and conscience as to the course he may take. I do not wish him to be guided by my wishes or example. If I have done wrong, let him do better. The present is a momentous question which every man must settle for himself and upon principle.

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