Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, Volume 21

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J. and A. Churchill, 1881 - Cytology
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Page 351 - ... the human subject. But even should nothing more be effected than what seems to be already on the point of attainment— the means of securing poultry from death by fowl-cholera, and cattle from the terribly destructive splenic fever — it must be admitted that we have an instance of a most valuable result from the much-reviled
Page 437 - I would suggest that in the formation of the polar cells part of the constituents of the germinal vesicle which are requisite for its functions as a complete and independent nucleus are removed to make room for the supply of the necessary parts to it again by the spermatic nucleus (vide -p.
Page 346 - That they were causes of putrefaction, or other fermentative changes, was a thing scarcely thought of; and the notion that they had special relations to disease would have been regarded as the wildest of speculations.
Page 454 - The stalk connecting the glomerulus with the attachment of the mesentery varies in thickness in different sections, but we believe that the glomerulus is continued unbroken throughout the very considerable region through which it extends. This point is, however, difficult to make sure of owing to the facility with which the glomerulus breaks away. At the stage we are describing, no true Malpighian bodies are present in the part of the Wolffian body on the same level with the anterior end of the glomerulus,...
Page 453 - In a paper by Mr. Balfour and myself in the ' Quart. Journ. of Micr. Science/ vol. xix, describing the development of what we believed to be a rudimentary head-kidney in the chick, we drew attention to a structure which so closely resembled the glomerulus of the head-kidney of the Icthyopsida that we identified it as an homologous structure.
Page 349 - So far as I am aware, this is the first time this honor has come to the District of Columbia.
Page 453 - It extends from the anterior end of the Wolffian body to the point where the foremost opening of the head-kidney commences. We have found it at a period slightly earlier than that of the first development of the head-kidney. In the interior of this body is seen a stroma with numerous vascular channels and blood-corpuscles, and a vascular connection is apparently becoming established, if it is not so already, between the glomerulus and the aorta. The stalk connecting the glomerulus with the attachment...
Page 348 - ... exist as a deadly blood disease, caused by the development of micro-organisms, equally distinct from pyaemia and from the chemically toxic effects of septic products. On some occasions, as the result of the introduction of putrid fluid under the mouse's skin, Koch found, besides septicaemia, a local affection of the seat of inoculation, in the form of spreading gangrene ; and, on investigating the part, he discovered in it, exactly corresponding with the extent of the local affection, another...
Page 454 - ... difficult to make sure of owing to the facility with which the glomerulus breaks away. At the stage we are describing, no true Malpighian bodies are present in the part of the Wolffian body on the same level with the anterior end of the glomerulus, but the Wolffian body merely consists of the Wolffian duct. At the level of the posterior part of the glomerulus this is no longer the case, but here a regular series of primary Malpighian bodies is present (using the term " primary" to denote the...
Page 382 - At p. 368, loc. at., my statement runs — "I have long been of the opinion which Prof. Claus appears to hold, that the appendages of the Arthropoda are homologous (or, to use a more distinctive term, ' homogenous ') with the appendages of the Chaetopoda, and on this account I consider it a proper step in classification to associate the Chaetopoda with the Arthropoda and Rotifera in one large phylum — the Appendiculata.

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