CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 91st Edition

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William M. Haynes
Taylor & Francis, Jul 1, 2010 - Science - 2610 pages
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Mirroring the growth and direction of science for a century, the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, now in its 91st edition, continues to be the most accessed and respected scientific reference in the world, used by students and Nobel Laureates. Available in its traditional print format, the Handbook is also available as an innovative interactive product on CD-ROM and online. This year’s edition adds many new tables and major revisions ...

For the electronic version of the Handbook, go to the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CD-ROM 2010

NEW AND UPDATED TABLES FOR THIS EDITION

Section 6: Fluid Properties
-- New tables on thermophysical properties of selected fluids at saturation and on the dependence of liquid density on temperature and pressure
-- Major updates for tables on the density of water and properties of ice and D2O
-- Major update and expansion of the table on critical constants of organic compounds
Section 8: Analytical Chemistry
-- Major updates for tables on the ionization constants of water and heavy water
Section 9: Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy
-- Updates for tables on atomic radii of the elements, bond dissociation energies, and spectroscopic constants of diatomic molecules
Section 10: Atomic, Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy
-- Major update for the table on atomic transition probabilities (added new elements) and updates for tables on electron affinities and atomic and molecular polarizabilities
Section 12: Properties of Solids
-- New table on electron stopping powers of elements
Section 13: Polymer Properties
-- New tables on abbreviations in polymer science and on physical properties of polymers

The benchmark of scientific reference since the days of Einstein, Eddington, and Planck, no book is held to a higher standard than the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Perpetually vetted for misspellings, miscalculations, misperceptions, and misnomers, it is republished every year, so no mistake needs to be long abided, no enhancement long awaited.

The job of editing the Handbook requires not only one who is relentless, driven to perpetually push the level of accuracy one more decimal point, but also one who is humble enough and smart enough to understand that the Handbook, like science itself, is a living, changing thing, and that it is both a record of achievement and a foundation for further improvement of that record. Until this year, the Handbook has been guided through 90 editions by just four editors. The last, David Lide, guided the book through 20 editions. Perhaps most importantly, Dr. Lide guided the Handbook into the electronic age, overseeing the creation and the continual improvement of interactive web and CD versions that have now become staples in every research library of note.

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About the author (2010)

Introducing Mickey Haynes
For 20 years, we have seen the name of Dr. Lide embossed on the cover of the Handbook as editor-in-chief. Now a new name is embossed in silver: William M. Haynes. Dr. Mickey Haynes brings with him the most absolute qualification: a career devoted to finding and capturing the best data. Most notably, Dr. Haynes worked more than three decades for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). His last three years at NIST were as Chief of the Physical and Chemical Properties Division and currently he is a scientist emeritus with NIST. During his tenure, he was involved in major projects on the properties of natural gas, cryogenic fluids, air, alternative refrigerants, and ammonia/water systems. He was responsible for the development of apparatus for measurements of both transport and thermodynamic properties of fluids and models to represent the data.

Dr. Haynes is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Thermophysics and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. With his background, Dr. Haynes’ influence will be especially significant in the fluids property data, which he has already expanded for the 91st edition. But it hardly stops there, for like Dr. Lide and the editors before him, Dr. Haynes is already proving himself relentless with his efforts to make all the data more reliable and more stable.

Profile of Dr. Haynes
Mickey Haynes joined the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1970 as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate after completing his Ph.D. in physics at the University of Virginia. During this associateship, he carried out an experimental program on the viscosity of cryogenic fluids. In 1972 he became a permanent staff member and was involved in research on measurements and correlations of the thermophysical properties of fluids and fluid mixtures of scientific and industrial interest. He was involved in major projects on the properties of natural gas, cryogenic fluids, air, alternative refrigerants, and ammonia/water systems. Mickey was responsible for the development of state-of-the-art apparatus for measurements of both transport and thermodynamic properties of fluids (e.g., magnetic suspension densimeters and torsional crystal viscometers). The apparatus were used for fluid thermophysical property measurements at low and high temperatures and at extreme pressures; and for the development of empirical and theoretical models for the prediction of fluid properties.

In 1985, Mickey became Group Leader of the Properties of Fluids Group in the Thermophysics Division and served in that capacity for ten years. In 1989 he assumed the position of Deputy Chief of the Thermophysics Division, which was reorganized and became the Physical and Chemical Properties Division in 1996. While remaining in the Deputy Chief position, Mickey became the Assistant Director for Boulder of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (CSTL) in 1994. He stayed in these positions until becoming the Chief of the Physical and Chemical Properties Division in 1999. Mickey remained in this position until he retired from the NIST in January 2003.

Mickey served on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, Review of Scientific Instruments, and Cryogenics. At the request of the ASME Heat Transfer Division Committee on Thermophysical Properties, he was Chair and Organizer of the 13th and 14th Symposia on Thermophysical Properties in 1997 and 2000, respectively. Mickey has been previously active on ASTM Committee D03 on Gaseous Fuels (Chair of the ASTM Subcommitte D03.08 on Thermophysical Properties) and the ASME K-7 Committee on Thermophysical Properties. He has recently served on the International Advisory Committees of the 16th and 17th European Conferences on Thermophysical Properties, the 6th and 7th Asian Thermophysical Properties Conferences, and the 17th IUPAC Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics. Mickey was elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 1999 and has received several Department of Commerce (DOC)/NIST awards.

Since his retirement from the NIST in 2003, Mickey has remained active in several areas. Currently, he is a Scientist Emeritus in CSTL. He has been the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Thermophysics since 1997. Mickey was the President of the Executive Board responsible for organization of THERMO International, a joint conference comprised of the 16th Symposium on Thermophysical Properties, the 19th IUPAC Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics, and the 61st Calorimetry Conference held in Boulder in August, 2006. He has been a member of the ASME K-7 Committee on Thermophysical Properties since 1992 and is currently serving on the Touloukian Award Committee. Since 1998, Mickey has been a permanent member of the International Organizing Committee of the European Conference on Thermophysical Properties; he has also served on the International Advisory Committee of the Asian Thermophysical Properties Conference.

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