The handmaid to the arts [by R. Dossie.]., Volume 1

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Nourse, 1758 - 448 pages
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Page 407 - The substances which admit of being japanned are almost every kind that are dry and rigid, or not too flexible, as wood, metals, leather, and paper prepared. Wood and metals do not require any other preparation, but to have their surfaces perfectly...
Page 352 - ... slight violence; and it must then be divided into pieces, in order to its being taken off from the model, by cutting it with a knife with a very thin blade ; and being divided, must be cautiously...
Page 412 - ... coarse , varnish, composed in the following manner. Take of rectified spirits of wine one pint, and of coarse seed-lac and resin, each two ounces ; dissolve the seed-lac and resin in the spirit, and then strain off the varnish. This varnish, as well as all others formed of...
Page 357 - Also a straight piece of stick must be put to the principal part of the body, and pieces of wire to the extremities of the other parts, in order that they may form, when drawn out after the matter of the mould is set and firm, proper channels for pouring in the metal, and vents for the air ; which otherwise, by the rarefaction it would undergo from the heat of the metals, would blow it out, or burst the mould.
Page 358 - ... till the whole be red hot. The animal or vegetable inclosed in the mould will then be burnt to a coal ; and may be totally calcined to ashes, by blowing for some time...
Page 426 - The pieces of work to be varnished should be placed near a fire, or in a room where there is a stove, and made perfectly dry, and then the varnish may be...
Page 436 - ... made in the proportion of two ounces of alum to a quart of water. For a less bright red...
Page 439 - Brush the wood to be stained several times with a strong decoction of logwood and Brazil, made in the proportion of one pound of the logwood and a quarter of a pound of the Brazil to a gallon of water, and boiled for an hour or more. When the wood has been brushed over...
Page 416 - For a scarlet japan ground, vermilion may be •sed : but the vermilion has a glaring effect, that renders it much less beautiful than the crimson produced by glazing it over with carmine or fine lake, or- even with rose pink, which has a very good effect used for this purpose. For a very bright crimson, nevertheless, instead of glazing with carmine, the Indian lake should be...
Page 412 - ... moistened, till the whole appear perfectly plain and even. The priming will then be completed, and the work ready to receive the painting, or coloured varnish : the rest of the proceedings being the same in this case as where no priming is used.

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