Junia: The First Woman Apostle

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Fortress Press, 2005 - Religion - 138 pages
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The name "Junia" appears in Romans 16:7, and Paul identifies her (along with Andronicus) as "prominent among the apostles." In this important work, Epp investigates the mysterious disappearance of Junia from the traditions of the church. Because later theologians and scribes could not believe (or wanted to suppress) that Paul had numbered a woman among the earliest churches' apostles, Junia's name was changed in Romans to a masculine form. Despite the fact that the earliest churches met in homes and that other women were clearly leaders in the churches (e.g., Prisca and Lydia), calling Junia an apostle seemed too much for the tradition. Epp tracks how this happened in New Testament manuscripts, scribal traditions, and translations of the Bible. In this thoroughgoing study, Epp restores Junia to her rightful place.
 

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User Review  - aevaughn - LibraryThing

This provocatively titled book is a well-written detailed look at Romans 16:7. Eldon Epp is quite convincing that Junia was indeed a prominent woman Apostle of the 1st century. This book goes into a great deal of technical detail, but his charts make many of his points quite well! Read full review

Contents

IV
3
V
9
VI
12
VII
14
VIII
15
IX
21
X
23
XII
32
XX
63
XXI
65
XXII
66
XXIII
69
XXIV
79
XXV
82
XXVI
84
XXVII
110

XIII
36
XIV
40
XV
45
XVI
49
XVII
53
XVIII
60
XIX
62
XXVIII
123
XXIX
126
XXX
133
XXXI
134
XXXII
137
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About the author (2005)

Eldon Jay Epp is Harkness Professor of Biblical Literature emeritus and Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences emeritus at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio).

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