Literary Occasions: Essays

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Feb 10, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 240 pages
2 Reviews
Nobel laureate V. S. Naipaul brings his signature gifts of observation, his ferocious impatience with received truths, and his masterfully condensed prose to these eleven essays on reading, writing, and identity—which have been brought together for the first time.
Here the subject is Naipaul’s literary evolution: the books that delighted him as a child; the books he wrote as a young man; the omnipresent predicament of trying to master an essentially metropolitan, imperial art form as an Asian colonial from a New World plantation island. He assesses Joseph Conrad, the writer most frequently cited as his forebear, and, in his celebrated Nobel Lecture, “Two Worlds,” traces the full arc of his own career. Literary Occasions is an indispensable addition to the Naipaul oeuvre, penetrating, elegant, and affecting.


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User Review  - James.Igoe - LibraryThing

From what I have read about him, Naipaul is a harsh person, so I approached this cautiously, but I found his prose thoroughly enjoyable, although I have currently shelved his fiction writing. I was ... Read full review

LITERARY OCCASIONS: Essays

User Review  - Kirkus

This miscellany of essays and reviews is a pendant to the 2001 Nobel laureate's recent Between Father and Son: Family Letters (2000) and The Writer and the World (2002).The contents, introduced and ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Jasmine
Prologue to an Autobiography
Foreword to The Adventures of Gurudeva
Foreword to A House for Mr BiswasKnopf 1983
PART TWO
Indian Autobiographies
The Last of the Aryans
Theatrical Natives

8
9
PART ONE
East Indian
Conrads Darkness and Mine
The Nobel Lecture
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

V.S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932. He came to England on a scholarship in 1950. He spent four years at University College, Oxford, and began to write, in London, in 1954. He pursued no other profession.
 
His novels include A House for Mr Biswas, The Mimic Men, Guerrillas, A Bend in the River, and The Enigma of Arrival. In 1971 he was awarded the Booker Prize for In a Free State. His works of nonfiction, equally acclaimed, include Among the Believers, Beyond Belief, The Masque of Africa, and a trio of books about India: An Area of Darkness, India: A Wounded Civilization and India: A Million Mutinies Now.
 
In 1990, V.S. Naipaul received a knighthood for services to literature; in 1993, he was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001. He lived with his wife Nadira and cat Augustus in Wiltshire, and died in 2018.

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