Operation and Modeling of the MOS Transistor

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2011 - Computers - 723 pages
0 Reviews
Operation and Modeling of the MOS Transistor has become a standard in academia and industry. Extensively revised and updated, the third edition of this highly acclaimed text provides a thorough treatment of the MOS transistor--the key element of modern microelectronic chips.

New to this edition:

* Energy bands and the energy barrier viewpoint are integrated into the discussion in a smooth, simple manner
* Expanded discussion of small-dimension effects, including velocity saturation, drain-induced barrier lowering, ballistic operation, polysilicon depletion, quantum effects, gate tunneling current, and gate-induced drain leakage
* Expanded discussion of small-signal modeling, including gate and substrate current modeling and flicker noise
* New chapter on substrate nonuniformity and structural effects, discussing transversal and lateral (halo) doping nonuniformity, stress and well proximity effects, and statistical variability
* A completely re-written chapter on modeling for circuit simulation, covering the considerations and pitfalls in the development of models for computer-aided design
* Extensively updated bibliography
* An accompanying website includes additional details not covered in the text, as well as model computer code

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2011)


Yannis Tsividis is Charles Batchelor Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University. His work with MOS transistors began in 1975 as part of his Ph.D. work at the University of California, Berkeley, in the context of the design and fabrication of the first fully-integrated MOS operational amplifier. He is a Fellow of IEEE. Among his awards are the 1984 IEEE W. R. G. Baker Prize for the best IEEE publication and the 2003 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference Outstanding Paper Award.

Colin McAndrew became involved with modeling semiconductor devices in 1987 and has contributed to the development of models for MOS, bipolar, and passive devices. He developed the backward-propagation-of-variation (BPV) technique for statistical modeling and has been a primary advocate of the use of Verilog-A and compilers for device modeling. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Waterloo, works at Freescale Semiconductor, and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Bibliographic information