Travesties

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1975 - Drama - 71 pages
4 Reviews
Travesties was born out of Stoppard's noting that in 1917 three of the twentieth century's most crucial revolutionaries -- James Joyce, the Dadaist founder Tristan Tzara, and Lenin -- were all living in Zurich. Also living in Zurich at this time was a British consula official called Henry Carr, a man acquainted with Joyce through the theater and later through a lawsuit concerning a pair of trousers. Taking Carr as his core, Stoppard spins this historical coincidence into a masterful and riotously funny play, a speculative portrait of what could have been the meeting of these profoundly influential men in a germinal Europe as seen through the lucid, lurid, faulty, and wholy riveting memory of an aging Henry Carr.

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Review: Travesties

User Review  - Goodreads

i liked it but i think a lot went over my head and it has a lot of "tricks" which i usually like but idk there is a limit i think and this pushes the limit. maybe if i was smarter i would "get" more of it and i would like it more. ill read it again later and hopefully will like it more Read full review

Review: Travesties

User Review  - Goodreads

Pretty pure Stoppard: philosophy and verbal hijinks, in this case blended for good measure with a dose of The Importance of Being Ernest. As matter of narrative, little really happens, but in between the forced interactions of The characters yields plenty of intellectual heat. Read full review

About the author (1975)

Tom Stoppard is the author of such seminal works as Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, Travesties, Every Good Boy Deserves a Favor, Arcadia, Jumpers, The Real Thing, and The Invention of Love.

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