Necktie Parties: A History of Legal Executions in Oregon, 1851-1905

Front Cover
Caxton Press, 2005 - History - 316 pages
0 Reviews
Diane Goeres-Gardner makes readers eyewitnesses to frontier justice in Necktie Parties. This is the story of the men who climbed the gallows steps and faced the hangman's noose during the early years of settlement in Oregon. Today, capital punishment is a controversial topic, in the United States and around the world. That wasn't the case during the 1800s on America's western frontier. Executions were public events drawing hundreds?sometimes thousands?of residents from miles around. The record of Oregon's hangings during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is a history of ordinary people who committed extraordinary acts. Goeres-Gardner also looks at the backgrounds of the condemned and their victims, the crimes and the investigations. The author uses trial records, witness testimony, newspaper reports and other historical records to bring to life each of the more than fifty cases included in Necktie Parties.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
1
IV
7
V
11
VI
16
VII
23
VIII
29
IX
32
X
35
XXIX
131
XXX
143
XXXI
149
XXXII
155
XXXIII
161
XXXIV
166
XXXV
175
XXXVI
185

XI
38
XII
42
XIII
46
XIV
49
XV
55
XVI
62
XVII
65
XVIII
69
XIX
75
XX
79
XXI
84
XXII
92
XXIII
96
XXIV
102
XXV
105
XXVI
110
XXVII
116
XXVIII
123
XXXVII
189
XXXVIII
194
XXXIX
201
XL
222
XLI
238
XLII
245
XLIII
252
XLIV
257
XLV
263
XLVI
268
XLVII
274
XLVIII
281
XLIX
288
L
291
LI
295
LII
297
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxii - Georgia, recommended that all executions should take place in the penitentiary, out of hearing and out of sight of all except officials, and such a law was passed.

About the author (2005)

Diane Goeres-Gardner is a fifth-generation Oregonian whose ancestors came to the region in 1852, settling in Tillamook County. A retired reading instructor, school administrator and mother of two, Diane lives in Umpqua Valley with her husband and "my little shadow, Cody Dog.

Bibliographic information