Cicero: On the Commonwealth and On the Laws

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 8, 2017 - Philosophy - 286 pages
0 Reviews
Cicero's On the Commonwealth and On the Laws were his first and most substantial attempts to adapt Greek theories of political life to the circumstances of the Roman Republic. They represent Cicero's understanding of government and remain his most important works of political philosophy. On the Commonwealth survives only in part, and On the Laws was never completed. The new edition of this volume has been revised throughout to take account of recent scholarship, and features a new introduction, a new bibliography, a chronological table and a biographical index. James E. G. Zetzel offers a scholarly reconstruction of the fragments of On the Commonwealth and a masterly translation of both dialogues. The texts are further supported by notes and synopsis, designed to assist students in politics, philosophy, ancient history, law and classics.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Editors Note page
vi
Text and Translation
xxix
Chronology
xlix
59
3
Book 4
79
Book 6
93
On the Laws
107
Book 2
131
Book 3
159
Fragments of On the Laws
178
Index of Fragments
202
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)

James E. G. Zetzel is Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature at Columbia University, New York. He has lectured and published widely on Latin literature, ancient law and political theory, and the history of scholarship. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony. Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ. Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

Bibliographic information