Anglia, Volume 21

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M. Niemeyer, 1899 - English philology
 

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Page 463 - ¿sometimes he will be lengthening out a verse in the singingpsalms, half a minute after the rest of the congregation have done with it ; sometimes, when he is pleased with the matter of his devotion , he pronounces Amen three or four times to the same prayer”
Page 263 - with the causes, and occasions of them, and all other events concerning Learning, through the ages of the World; I may truly affirme to be wanting. The vse and end of which worke, I doe not so much designe for curiosity, or satisfaction of those that are the louers of Learning; but chiefly for a [p.
Page 262 - and Literary, whereof the three first I allow as extant, the fourth I note as deficient. For no man hath propounded to him selfe the generall state of Learning to be described and represented from age to age as many haue done the
Page 504 - ¿produced several new grins of his own invention having been used to cut faces for many years together over his last. At the very first grin he cast every human feature out of his countenance, at the second he became the face of a spout, at the third a baboon.”
Page 99 - verse will, therefore, I fear, be too often found in description exuberant, in argument loquacious, and in narration tiresome.” ¿His diction is certainly poetical as it is not prosaic, and elegant as it is not vulgar. He is to be commended as having fewer artifices of disgust than most of his
Page 489 - I could not but take notice of two parties of very fine women , that had placed themselves in the opposite sideboxes and seemed drawn up in a kind of battle array one against another. After a short survey of them I found they
Page 501 - that is perpetually putting cases, repeating the transactions of WestMinsterHall, wrangling with you upon the most indifferent circumstances of life, and not to be convinced of the distance of a place or of the most trivial point in conversation but by dint of argument.”
Page 496 - acquaint the reader, that though our club meets only on Tuesdays and Thursdays, we have appointed a Committee to sit every night, for the inspection of all such papers as may contribute to the advancement of the public weal!”
Page 262 - the Invention of Arts, or vsages. But a just story of Learning, containing the Antiquities and originals of Knowledges, and their Sects; their Inventions, their Traditions; their diverse Administrations, and Managings; their Flourishings, their Oppositions, Decayes, Depressions, Oblivions,
Page 505 - The stout man was smoking with great vehemence, but between every halfdozen puffs, he took his pipe from his mouth and looked first at Mr. Weller and then at Mr. Pickwick .... Then he would take another halfdozen puffs with an air of profound meditation and look at

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