The Politics of Language in Chinese Education: 1895 - 1919

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BRILL, 2008 - Social Science - 537 pages
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The study examines the origins of the "literary revolution" proclaimed in 1917 which laid the foundation for the replacement of the classical language by the vernacular as China's national language and medium of national literature. A unique, multifaceted approach is used to explain the political significance of the classical/vernacular divide against the backdrop of social change that followed the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-5. Seeing education as the central battleground for all debates on language, the study in six thoroughly documented chapters investigates the language policy of the Qing and Republican governments, vernacular journalism of the revolutionaries, the activities of urban script reformers, the linguistic thought of the national essence advocates, and the emergence of a scholarly interest in the vernacular in academic circles.
 

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Contents

Chapter One The Politics of Language in China and
1
China
27
Chapter Two The Language Question at the Turn of
77
for Broader Education
90
From Literacy
132
Chapter Three The Revolutionary Movement
161
Chapter Four The Struggle for Legitimate Language
233
Philology National Essence and the Emergence
323
Chapter Six From Political Revolution to Literary
391
Conclusions
463
Selected Bibliography
475
Index and Glossary
509
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About the author (2008)

Elisabeth Kaske, Ph.D. (2006) in Chinese Studies, Heidelberg University, is Junior Professor of Chinese Studies at Frankfurt University. She has published on the history of late Qing China, including Bismarcks Missionare: Deutsche Militarinstrukteure in China 1884 1890 (Wiesbaden 2002).

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