Extracts from the Reports of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools: Intended Chiefly for the Use of the Managers and Teachers of Such Elementary Schools as are Not Receiving Government Aid

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1852 - Elementary school teaching - 315 pages
 

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Page 6 - ... the Inspector in making an unhappy start in the examination ; perhaps by a question too easy or too difficult at the outset, he may have caused perplexity, instead of giving confidence and assurance to the children : but after every drawback that can be fairly made on these grounds, it is hoped that an honest teacher will, on reflection, be convinced that he has not done his duty. One who is fertile in excuses will occasionally come forward, and urge that he has so many hindrances with the parents,...
Page 40 - This sort of correction naturally breeds an aversion to that which it is the tutor's business to create a liking to. How obvious is it to observe, that children come to hate things which were at first acceptable to them...
Page 40 - The usual lazy and short way by chastisement and the rod, which is the only instrument of government that tutors generally know or ever think of, is the most unfit of any to be used in education...
Page 242 - But the Prussian teacher has no book. He needs none, He teaches from a full mind. He cumbers and darkens the subject with no technical phraseology. He observes what proficiency the child has made, and then adapts his instructions, both in quality and amount, to the necessity of the case. He answers all questions ; he solves all doubts. It is one of his objects, at every recitation, so to present ideas that they shall start doubts and provoke questions.
Page 180 - Lastly, that, providing for those technical branches of instruction which are not only valuable in themselves, but necessary to secure that public opinion of the parents favourable to the school, on which its success must after all depend, it provides further for that oral instruction of a more general kind, which aims at results less tangible, indeed, but the highest contemplated in education, and the most valuable; that...
Page 177 - It will be observed that the first or lowest division of the school is occupied during the first hour in reading ; that it is then placed under oral instruction, which oral instruction, conducted by the head-master, is supposed to be founded (where that is practicable) upon the reading lesson which the children have just been...
Page 92 - ... other ways they might impart a healthy stimulus to the education of the poor in this county. But next, the condition of the employed, of the poor themselves, in factory districts, presents, perhaps, the greatest difficulty in the way of education, and one which it will be most arduous to surmount. There are the impediments arising from the social state and habits of the parents. They work hard, but they also drink hard. They earn good wages, but they also spend them, and acquire no property....
Page 200 - ... moral and religious duty resulting from them, follow us into every calling, and create the constant employment of our habits and principles. " Whatever may be our post or profession, and whatever skill or learning it may require, which, no doubt, ought to be provided in youth, still our first and last care for ourselves and our young families should be, that we be instructed in our obligations and duties, and acquire the skill of being good men. It is only a debasement of the mind either for...
Page 52 - British system respects this natural and important principle in various ways. While it discourages all neglect of Divine worship, it leaves to the parents to direct in what manner, and at whose hands, their children shall on that day receive religious instruction. Teachers are recommended to maintain a constant communication with parents, respecting the habits and principles of the scholars ;' by which means they may greatly improve the influence. of parental authority, and also strengthen both that...
Page 65 - Having myself examined some thousands of children whose entire Scriptural instruction is comprised in thus learning to read (mechanically) from the Scriptures, I can state as the result of my experience that the entire school occupation of a child continued for years may have been the perusal of the Scriptures, and yet no elementary Scriptural truths have been stored up in its mind ; and the child be found as utterly unacquainted with the subject-matter of their simplest narrative portions as with...

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