The Quarterly Review, Volume 65

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J. Murray, 1840
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Page 22 - The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field: which indeed is the least of all seeds : but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof.
Page 511 - All sacrifices do but speed forward that great day, when the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the waters cover the sea.
Page 6 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor : suit the action to the word, the word to the action ; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature...
Page 392 - One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear, When they reached the hall door, and the charger stood near; So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung ! — "She is won ! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur ! They'll have fleet steeds that follow !
Page 314 - The according music of a well-mix'd state. Such is the world's great harmony, that springs From order, union, full consent of things...
Page 516 - Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality ; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half of the human race to misery that some few may monopolize according to law. A system could not well have been devised more studiously hostile to human happiness than marriage.
Page 364 - And, like th' old Hebrews, many years did stray, In deserts but of small extent, Bacon, like Moses, led us forth at last : The barren wilderness he past ; Did on the very border stand Of the blest promis'd land ; And from the mountain's top of his exalted wit, Saw it himself, and shew'd us it.
Page 516 - Promises, covenants, and oaths, which are the bonds of human society, can have no hold upon an atheist. The taking away of God, though but even in thought, dissolves all.
Page 527 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 214 - ... language. Which of us, for instance, could follow an American Indian through a sentence of more than three words? All savages appear to possess, to an uncommon degree, this power of mimicry. I was told, almost in the same words, of the same ludicrous habit among the Caffres: the Australians, likewise, have long been notorious for being able to imitate and describe the gait of any man, so that he may be recognised.

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