The Commercial Products of India: Being an Abridgement of "The Dictionary of the Economic Products of India."

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J. Murray, 1908 - Agriculture - 1189 pages
 

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Page 443 - Bengalees about Calcutta call danga. It is often planted on land where sugarcane grew the preceding year, and is deemed a meliorating crop. The soil must be well ploughed and cleared of weeds, &c. It is then raised in April and May, according as the rains begin to fall, into ridges nine or ten inches high and eighteen or twenty broad, with intervening trenches nine or ten inches broad. The cuttings or sets, viz. small portions of the fresh root, are planted on the tops of the ridges at about eighteen...
Page 467 - ... butter. The milk, on its arrival, is immediately boiled for at least one hour ; but two or three hours are reckoned better. The earthen pots, in which this is done, are in. general so nasty, that after this operation no part of the produce of the dairy is tolerable to an European ; and whatever they use, their own servants must prepare.
Page 484 - in strength it is only inferior to Sal, while in many other useful qualities it surpasses 'it, and has the advantage of being lighter. For felloes and naves of wheels and ' carved work of every description, for framings of carriages and similar work, it is 'unsurpassed by any other...
Page 108 - ... is not fixed so arbitrarily that it cannot be retarded or accelerated by climatic influences. It is an undoubted fact that the flowering of the bamboo is decidedly influenced by the causes which bring about famine, for the providential supply of food from this source has saved the lives of thousands of persons during several of the great famines of India.
Page 427 - The time for planting out the bulbs is in July and August, and all that the cultivator has to do is to break up the surface gently a few times and to ensure the proper drainage of the plot by digging a neat trench on all four sides. The flowers appear about the middle of October, and the purple blooms and the delicious, though somewhat overpowering, scent of the saffron turn the dry, uninviting plateau above Pampur into a rare and wonderful garden. Saffron...
Page 524 - A small evergreen tree met with throughout India and Burma, ascending the hills to about 6,000 feet. la chiefly found along river beds, and is especially cultivated for its fruit in gardens and in avenues. There are several varieties that yield much better flavored fruit than others, but as a rule it is astringent and only serviceable when cooked in tarts and puddings.
Page 499 - This is the most superb tree we met with in the Indian forests : we saw several species, but this is the only common one here ; it is conspicuous for its gigantic size, and for the straightness and graceful form of its tall unbranched pale grey trunk, and small symmetrical crown : many individuals were upwards of 200 feet high, and fifteen in girth. Its leaves are broad, glossy, and beautiful; the flowers...
Page 543 - ... always arrived regularly, and remained throughout the season ; and the fishermen's belief is that they are at the present day frightened away by the numerous steamers which call at Cochin, and retire in search of a less disturbed spot. In addition to steam-boat traffic, noises in boats...
Page 566 - It would not be far from correct to describe cotton as the central feature of the world's modern commerce. Certainly no more remarkable example of a sudden development exists in the history of economic products than is the case with cotton. The enormous importance of the textile to-day, in the agricultural, commercial, industrial and social life of the world, renders it difficult to believe that but little more than two hundred years ago cotton was practically unknown to the civilised nations of...
Page 234 - Baiug, the traders on nearing the market usually throw the baskets for a day or two into the nearest stream, by which simple process the article is made to recover its lost dampness, and weighs as much as it did when purchased. In Upper Burma and the Shan States a good deal of this tea is consumed as a drink, for which purpose it is sold in a dry state. It is prepared by boiling it in an earthen kettle, and is drunk with salt. The greater bulk, however, is sold by the Mandalay brokers to merchants...

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