The Book of the Princes of Wales, Heirs to the Crown of England

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Richard Bentley, 1860 - Great Britain - 539 pages
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Page 139 - All murder'd : for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court, and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...
Page 139 - To monarchize, be fear'd and kill with looks, Infusing him with self and vain conceit, As if this flesh which walls about our life, Were brass impregnable...
Page 411 - He is so ugly, that I am ashamed of him ; but his size and fatness supply the want of beauty. I wish you could see the gentleman, for he has no ordinary mien ; be is so serious in all that he does, that I cannot help deeming him far wiser than myself.
Page 502 - George's own later verdict on him was that he was 'an intriguing, unworthy man more fitted to be a Jesuit than an English bishop'.7 Ructions soon followed these appointments. Hayter accused subPreceptor Scott of insulting language and personal violence ; being also a mathematician and Fellow of the Royal Society he was naturally suspect as an atheist. 8 Harcourt then smeared his deputy, Stone, and also the Princess's...
Page 429 - I think not Prince Charles safe in Jersey, therefore send for him to wait upon thee with all speed ; for his preservation is the greatest hope for my safety ; and in God's name let him stay with thee, till it is seen what ply my business will take. And for my sake let the world see that the queen seeks not to alter his conscience.
Page 352 - O shoot up fast in spirit, as in years ; That when upon her head proud Europe wears. Her stateliest tire, you may appear thereon The richest gem, without a paragon. Shine bright and fixed as the arctic star : And when slow time hath made you fit for war, Look over the strict ocean, and think where You may but lead us forth, that grow up here Against a day, when our officious swords Shall speak our actions, better than our words.
Page 385 - was excellent at the instant discovery of a cadaverous face, on which he would not lavish any art. This made him at the first sight of sick Prince Henry to get himself out of sight.
Page 210 - Richard turned towards the young knight who was by his side and said, " Henry, my child, see what your father has done to me. He has actually invaded my land as an, enemy, and as if in regular warfare has taken captive and put to death my liege subjects without mercy or pity. Indeed, child, for you individually I am very sorry, because for this unhappy proceeding of your father you must, perhaps, be deprived of your inheritance.
Page 402 - The Lower House this day," he wrote, "has been a little unruly, but I hope it will turn to the best, for before they rose they began to be ashamed of it ; yet I could wish that the King would send down a...
Page 282 - We will that our said son have his breakfast immediately after his mass, and between that and his meat, to be occupied in such virtuous learning as his age shall suffer to receive. And that he be at his dinner at a convenient hour, and thereat to be honourably served, and his dishes to be borne by worshipful folks and squires, having on our livery, and that all other officers and servants give their due attendance, according to their offices.

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