Parliaments and Political Change in Asia

Front Cover
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2005 - Political Science - 324 pages
0 Reviews
This study of the national parliaments of India, Indonesia, the Philippines, South Korea, and Thailand is inspired by four major theoretical discourses: neo-institutionalism, parliamentarianism versus presidentialism, majoritarian versus consensus democracy, and transition theory. The book examines the specific role of parliaments in political decision-making, regime change, democratization, and consolidation of democracy in a comparative perspective. It argues that parliaments play a greater part in the political decision-making than is often asserted and that there is no cogent causal relationship between parliamentary performance and system of government.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Roots of Contemporary Maritime Piracy in Southeast Asia
1
Piracy and Politics in Southeast Asia
103
International Cooperation and Japans Role
122
Cooperation Needs Efforts
143
Towards an Agenda for Piracy Research
160
Index
167
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

• Jürgen Rüland was the leader of the project team. He is Professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Science, Albert Ludwigs University, Freiburg, and Director of the Arnold Bergstraesser Institute, Freiburg, Germany.

• Clemens Jürgenmeyer, M.A., is Senior Research Fellow at the Arnold Bergstraesser Institute, Freiburg, Germany, and Managing Editor of Internationales Asienforum/International Quarterly for Asian Studies.

• Michael H. Nelson is Senior Research Fellow at the King Prajadhipok’s Institute, Nonthaburi, Thailand.

• Patrick Ziegenhain, M.A., is Research Fellow at the Arnold Bergstraesser Institute, Freiburg, Germany, and Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Political Science, Albert Ludwigs University, Freiburg.

Bibliographic information