Inside the Jihad: My Life with Al Qaeda

Front Cover
Basic Books, Mar 9, 2007 - History - 368 pages
From Europe's burgeoning terrorist underground, to the training camps of Afghanistan, to the radical mosques of London, this is a unique and chilling insider's story of the rise of Al Qaeda and the intelligence services that struggle to contain it.
Between 1994 and 2000, Omar Nasiri worked as a secret agent for Europe's top foreign intelligence services -- including France's DGSE (Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure), and Britain's MI5 and MI6. From the netherworld of Islamist cells in Belgium, to the training camps of Afghanistan, to the radical mosques of London, he risked his life to defeat the emerging global network that the West would come to know as Al Qaeda.
Now, for the first time, Nasiri shares the story of his life -- a life balanced precariously between the world of Islamic jihadists and the spies who pursue them. As an Arab and a Muslim, he was able to infiltrate the rigidly controlled Afghan training camps, where he encountered men who would later be known as the most-wanted terrorists on earth, going so far as to form a sleeper cell in Europe with Al Qaeda's top recruiter in Pakistan and London's radical cleric Abu Qatada.
A detailed portrait of a complex man who fought on both sides, Inside the Jihad is a terrifying, suspenseful look at an organization that continues to be a global threat.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - buffalogr - LibraryThing

Written by a muslim who joined with terrorists, it provides a good understanding of the feelings and thoughts of the militant muslem "terrorists" who inhabit our world at present. In his own words ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - spacecommuter - LibraryThing

In the months since I read this book, I've realized how valuable it is for understanding American policy, imprisonment and prosecution of terrorists and their allies. From his description of Abu ... Read full review

Contents

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Copyright

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Page i - Berlin border café, the narrator's reference to the film version of John Le Carre's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold...

About the author (2007)

Omar Nasiri (not his real name) was born in Morocco and currently resides in Germany with his wife.

Bibliographic information