The Count of Monte Cristo, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

I
II
11
III
21
IV
35
V
44
VI
61
VII
76
VIII
88
XIX
193
XX
221
XXI
237
XXIII
250
XXIV
257
XXV
270
XXVI
280
XXVII
290

IX
100
X
107
XI
118
XIII
129
XIV
138
XVI
148
XVII
160
XVIII
179
XXVIII
300
XXIX
310
XXX
330
XXXI
348
XXXII
357
XXXIV
372
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 267 - You see," said Dantes, quitting the helm, "I shall be of some use to you, at least, during the voyage. If you do not want me at Leghorn, you can leave me there, and I will pay you out of the first wages I get for my food and the clothes you lend me.
Page 267 - That's not fair," said the seaman who had saved Dantes, " for you know more than we do." " What is that to you, Jacopo?" returned the captain. " Every one is free to ask what he pleases." "That's true," replied Jacopo. "I only made a remark." " Well, you would do much better to lend him a jacket and a pair of trousers, if you have them.
Page 255 - Why, yes, the abbe runs a chance of being wet," said the other; and then there was a burst of brutal laughter. Dantes did not comprehend the jest, but his hair stood erect on his head. "Well, here we are at last," said one of them. "A little farther — a little farther," said the other. "You know very well that the last was stopped on his way, dashed on the rocks, and the governor told us next day that we were careless fellows.
Page 250 - It is very easy," he continued with a smile of bitterness ; " I will remain here ; I will rush on the first person who opens the door ; I will strangle him, and then they will guillotine me." But as it happens that in excessive griefs, as in great tempests, the abyss is found between the tops of the loftiest waves, Dantes recoiled from the idea of this infamous death and passed suddenly from despair to an ardent desire for life and liberty.
Page 255 - As he said this the man came towards Edmond, who heard a heavy and sounding substance laid down beside him, and at the same moment a cord was fastened round his feet with sudden and painful violence. " Well, have you tied the knot?" inquired the gravedigger, who was looking on. "Yes, and pretty tight too, I can tell you," was the answer. "Move on, then.
Page 263 - ... that she wished to pass, like most vessels bound for Italy, between the islands of Jaros and Calaseraigne. However, the vessel and the swimmer insensibly neared one another, and in one of its tacks...
Page 251 - I wish to reconquer the happiness of which I have been deprived. Before I die, I must not forget that I have my executioners to punish, and, perhaps, too, who knows, some friends to reward. Yet they will forget me here, and I shall die in my dungeon like Faria." As he said this, he remained motionless, his eyes fixed like a man struck with a sudden idea, but whom this idea fills with amazement. Suddenly he rose, lifted his hand to his brow as if his brain were giddy, paced twice or thrice...
Page 264 - Chateau d'lf behind. Dantes was so exhausted that the exclamation of joy he uttered was mistaken for a sigh. As we have said he was lying on the deck. A sailor was rubbing his limbs with a...
Page 258 - These words rang in Dantes' ears, even beneath the waves; he hastened to cleave his way through them to see if he had not lost his strength. He found with pleasure that his captivity had taken away nothing of his power, and that he was still master of that element on whose bosom he had so often sported as a boy. Fear, that relentless pursuer, clogged Dantes
Page 262 - Then boats filled with armed soldiers will pursue the wretched fugitive. The cannon will warn every one to refuse shelter to a man wandering about naked and famished. The police of Marseilles will be on the alert by land, whilst the governor pursues me by sea. I am cold, I am hungry. I have lost even the knife that saved me. Oh, my God! I have suffered enough surely. Have pity on me, and do for me what I am unable to do for myself.

Bibliographic information