Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb

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Ginn and Company, 1897 - Greek language - 472 pages
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Page 478 - Eastern and Western Hemispheres (one Map). 'World, Mercator's Projection. Eastern Hemisphere. Western Hemisphere. 'Europe. England. Scotland. Ireland. British Isles. Canada. Nova Scotia, etc. *United States. South America. France. Spain and Portugal. Italy. Central Europe. Orkney and Shetland. •Asia. India. 'Africa. Cape Colony. 'America. North America. Australia. New Zealand (in Counties). Pacific Ocean.
Page 53 - ... occurrences. The prevailing view is, if we except certain monographs upon the subject, best set forth by Goodwin in his Moods and Tenses, 155, 156, 157, and I accordingly make the presentation there given the basis of my remarks. Goodwin explains this use of the aorist by saying that it gives " a more vivid statement of general truths by employing a distinct case or several distinct cases in the past to represent (as it were) all possible cases, and implying that what has occurred is likely...
Page 170 - In general suppositions, the apodosis expresses a customary or repeated action or a general truth, and the protasis refers in a general way to any one of a class of acts.
Page 147 - TO FACT. 1397. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis has the adverb av. The imperfect here refers to present time or to an act as going on or repeated in past time, the aorist to a simple occurrence in past time, and the (rare) pluperfect to an act completed in past or present time. -Eg...
Page 478 - ... France. Spain and Portugal. Italy. Central Europe. Orkney and Shetland. *Asia. India. •Africa. Cape Colony. 'America. North America. Australia. New Zealand (in Counties). Pacific Ocean. Classical and Scriptural Geography.—Cassar de Bello Gallico.
Page 389 - ... is do not come down, there is great diversity of opinion as to the manner in which these meanings are obtained from the Greek expressions, and still greater as to the origin of the constructions themselves. Most scholars have explained expressions of denial with ov...
Page 404 - ISei etc. with the infinitive may be found in the same sentence with the ordinary use of these imperfects as past tenses, with no reference to any condition. A familiar case is in the New Testament, MATTH. xxiii. 23, TavTa 8e eSei 71-0177 crai Kaxtlva /j.rj d^Eivai, these (the weightier matters of the law) ought ye to have done, and yet not to have left the others (taking tithes) undone.
Page viii - ... above reasoning so fully justifies. It may be said in advance that almost every addition and alteration is a gain, but it is to be regretted that there have been left undone some things which ought to have been done, and that in other instances the author has failed to profit by the teachings of that scholar "whose writings have thrown light upon most of the dark places in Greek Syntax.
Page 147 - With Supposition contrary to Fact. 222. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis takes the adverb av.
Page 384 - There is, in fact, nothing in the earliest employment of these modes to prove that they might not all be specialized uses of forms originally equivalent — having, for instance, a general future meaning.

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