Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice: An Ethnobotanist Searches for New Medicines in the Amazon Rain Forest

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Viking, 1993 - Science - 318 pages
81 Reviews
For thousands of years, healers have used plants to cure illness. Aspirin, the world's most widely used drug, is based on compounds originally extracted from the bark of a willow tree, and more than a quarter of medicines found on pharmacy shelves contain plant compounds. Now Western medicine, faced with health crises such as AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer, has begun to look to the healing plants used by indigenous peoples to develop powerful new medicines. Nowhere is the search more promising than in the Amazon, the world's largest tropical forest, home to a quarter of all botanical species on this planet - as well as hundreds of Indian tribes whose medicinal plants have never been studied by Western scientists. In Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, ethnobotanist Mark J. Plotkin recounts his travels and studies with some of the most powerful Amazonian shamans, who taught him the plant lore their tribes have spent thousands of years gleaning from the rain forest. For more than a decade, Dr. Plotkin has raced against time to harvest and record new plants before the rain forests' fragile ecosystems succumb to overdevelopment - and before the Indians abandon their own culture and learning for the seductive appeal of Western material culture. Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice relates nine of the author's quests, taking the reader along on a wild odyssey as he participates in healing rituals; discovers the secret of curare, the lethal arrow poison that kills in minutes; tries the hallucinogenic snuff epena that enables the Indians to speak with their spirit world; and earns the respect and fellowship of the mysterious shamans as he proves that he shares both their endurance and theirreverence for the rain forest. Mark Plotkin combines the Darwinian spirit of the great writer-explorers of the nineteenth century - curious, discursive, and rigorously scientific - with a very modern concern for the erosion of our environment and the vanishing culture of native peoples. As Plotkin says, every time one of the old shamans dies, it's as if a library has burned to the ground. In Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, he shows his determination to preserve their knowledge not only as a contribution to Western medicine, but as an irreplaceable part of their heritage.

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Review: Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice: An Ethnobotanist Searches for New Medicines in the Rain Forest

User Review  - Timothy - Goodreads

An incredible tale of one man's journy through south and central America, exploring the cultures that still exist, and attempting to discern and discover their medicinal secrets and the plants used therin. Not overly technical, well written and an easy read. Read full review

Review: Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice: An Ethnobotanist Searches for New Medicines in the Rain Forest

User Review  - Timothy - Goodreads

An incredible tale of one man's journy through south and central America, exploring the cultures that still exist, and attempting to discern and discover their medicinal secrets and the plants used therin. Not overly technical, well written and an easy read. Read full review

Contents

Through the Emerald Door
1
The Search for the Black Caiman
19
Among the Maroons
53
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

LYNNE CHERRY has devoted her life to sharing her concern about environmental issues with others. Her important children's books also include The Armadillo from Amarillo and two tales from the Amazon rain forest: The Great Kapok Tree and The Shaman's Apprentice. She lives in Washington, D.C.

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