Montenegro: Its People and Their History

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Dalby, Isbister & Company, 1877 - Montenegro - 292 pages
 

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Page 201 - The Venetian Doge replies in flattering terms. Ivo repairs to his court, taking with him three loads of gold, in order to woo the fair Latin in his son's name. When he had lavished all his gold, the Latins agreed with him that the wedding should take place at the next vintage. Ivo, who was wise, uttered foolish words at his departure.
Page 291 - Sold separately. Commentary on the Epistles for the Sundays and other Holy Days of the Christian Year.
Page 157 - This was in 1484, in a petty principality ; they were men worsted in war, and flying for their lives. Again, it was only seven years after the earliest volume had been printed by Caxton in the rich and populous metropolis of England ; and when there was no printing-press in Oxford, or in Cambridge, or in Edinburgh. It was only sixteen years after the first printing-press had been established (1468) in Rome, the capital of Christendom : only twentyeight years after the appearance (1456) of the earliest...
Page 90 - ... patience, hunger, thirst, and every kind of privation. When the enemy is defeated and retiring, they pursue him with such rapidity, that they supply the want of cavalry, which it is impossible to employ in their mountainous country.
Page 90 - Arms, a small loaf of bread, a cheese, some garlic, a little brandy, an old garment, and two pair of sandals made of raw hide, form all the equipage of the Montenegrins.
Page 10 - ... the Turkish inhabitants of the lowlands; 3 and the name of one of the dynasties which formerly ruled this country, 4 have been assigned by one writer or another as the meaning of part of its name of Montenegro in the Venetian dialect of Italian, of Tzrnagora. in Slavonic, and of Karadagh in Turkish. Be this as it may, there is no doubt as to the remainder of the name by which the country is known. Politically, as well as geographically and historically, Montenegro is pre-eminently a land of mountains....
Page 90 - Their very games and amusements bear the stamp of a military character, and they are admitted by all to be most skilful shots. Being inured to hardships and privations, they perform, without fatigue and in high spirits, very long and forced marches. They leap over wide ditches, supporting themselves on their long rifles, and pass over precipices where bridges would be absolutely requisite for every other kind of troops, and they climb the steepest rocks with great facility ; they also bear, with...
Page 292 - I do not mean to disparage the labours and services of others when I say that, in my opinion, no diplomatist, no consul, no traveller, among our countrymen, has made such a valuable contribution to our means of knowledge in this important matter, as was made by Miss Mackenzie and Miss Irby, when they published, in 1867, their travels in some of the Slavonian Provinces of European Turkey.
Page 122 - Montenegrin hill-side, and returned after three years' absence to find every single thing as he had left it. It is the old story of the devotion of a simple-minded people, and the just administration of a Homeric chieftain—all the more easily carried out in such a country as the Tzernagora, because the Prince can be acquainted with the people as individuals, and can set them a personal example, eagerly caught up by each of his loving subjects.
Page 231 - ... shows that it was done under that high religious exaltation which recalls the fiery gloom of the Agamemnon, and the sanguinary episodes of the Old Testament. The hallowed eve draws onwards. The brothers Martinovitch kindle their consecrated torches. They pray fervently to the new-born God. Each drains a cup of wine ; and seizing the sacred torches, they rush forth into the darkness. Wherever there was a Turk, there came the five avengers. They that would not be baptised were hewn down every one.

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