Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society, Volume 19

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Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society, 1902 - Lancashire (England)
Vol. 7-10, 12-21 contain section: "Bibliography of Lancashire and Cheshire antiquities" (v. 12-21 include also bibliography).
 

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Page 255 - ... at the end of the seventeenth century or the beginning of the eighteenth.
Page 186 - COLCHESTER. By Rev. EL CUTTS. EXETER. By EA FREEMAN. LONDON. By Rev. WJ LOFTIE. OXFORD. By Rev. CW BOASE. WINCHESTER. By Rev. GW KITCHIN, DD YORK. By Rev. JAMES RAINE.
Page 184 - Several ancient crosses were to be found at one time near the boundaries of the ancient park, which was about threequarters of a mile in length and half a mile in width.
Page 7 - Henry our grandfather afforested, shall be viewed by good and lawful men: and if he have made forest of any other wood more than of his own demesne, whereby the owner of the wood hath hurt, forthwith it shall be disafforested: and if he have •made forest of his own wood, then it shall remain forest; saving the common of herbage, and of other things in the same forests, to them which before were accustomed to have the* same, 2.
Page 235 - Black rode, and had issue," &c. Of this Mabel is a story by tradition of undoubted verity, " that in Sir Wm. Bradshaghe absence (beinge 10 years away in the holy wars), she married a Welsh knight. Sir William, returning from the wars, came in a palmer's habitt amongst the poor to Haghe, who, when she saw and congetringe that he favoured her former husband, wept, for which the knight chastised her ; at which Sir William went and made himself known to...
Page 2 - Swarm'd overseas, and harried what was left: And so there grew great tracts of wilderness, Wherein the beast was ever more and more, But man was less and less, till Arthur came.
Page 227 - Christian kings, and no date ascribed to their reign. After which period, Oswald was killed in a great battle, by the same pagan nation and pagan king of the Mercians, who had slain his predecessor Edwin, at a place called in the English tongue Maserfield, in the thirty-eighth year of his age, on the fifth day of the month of August.
Page 228 - And in the place where he was killed by the Pagans, fighting for his country, infirm men and cattle are healed to this day." — " Nor is it to be wondered at, that the sick should be healed in the place where he died, for whilst he lived, he never ceased to provide for the poor and infirm, and to bestow alms on them and assist them.
Page 235 - Bradshaighe, 2d son to Sir John, was a great traveller and a souldger, and married to Mabell, daughter and sole heire of Hugh Norris de Haghe and Blackrode, and had issue,
Page 228 - God, and how remarkable his devotion, has been made evident by miracles since his death ; for, in the place where he was killed by the pagans, fighting for his country, infirm men and cattle are healed to this day. Whereupon many took up the very dust of the place where his body fell, and putting it into water, did much good with it to their friends who were sick. This custom came so much into use, that the earth being carried away by degrees, there remained a hole as deep as the height of a man.

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