The Housekeeper's Encyclopedia of Useful Information for the Housekeeper in All Branches of Cooking and Domestic Economy ...

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D. Appleton, 1861 - Cooking - 445 pages
A comprehensive guide to running a household, the bulk of which is dedicated to recipes and other tips for working with food.
 

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What a fascinating look at the housekeeping of the 1800's. I haven't gotten as far as the cooking yet, but the instructions for cleaning garments, expectations of the servants duties, and even a chapter of expectations for the husband's behavior...they are well written and thought out.
I like how the husband is advised to be supportive and careful of his wife's feelings. I also like that they are advised not to fuss when giving a party because if they aren't having a good time, then no one is.
I'm downloading this so I can read more!
 

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excellent information

Contents

I
1
II
43
III
58
IV
212
V
229
VI
272
VII
286
VIII
306
IX
360
X
367
XI
371
XII
398

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Page 44 - To make use of a familiar, but not on that account a less just illustration, the animal body acts, in this respect, as a furnace, which we supply with fuel. It signifies nothing what intermediate forms food may assume, what changes it may undergo in the body, the last change is uniformly the conversion of its carbon into carbonic acid, and of its hydrogen into water. The unassimilated nitrogen of the food, along with the unburned or unoxidized carbon, is expelled in the urine or in the solid excrements.
Page 44 - ... its oxidation or combustion. In winter, when we take exercise in a cold atmosphere, and when consequently the amount of inspired oxygen increases, the necessity for food containing carbon and hydrogen increases in the same ratio ; and by gratifying the appetite thus excited, we obtain the most efficient protection against the most piercing cold. A starving man is soon frozen to death ; and every one knows, that the animals of prey in the arctic regions far exceed in voracity those of the torrid...
Page 80 - ... possible, the finer the better. Freshen by leaving it in water one hour. Pour off the water and fill up with fresh. Bring it to a scald, pour it off, and put on the fish just enough water to cover it. Add to a. quart of the soaked fish a bit of butter the size of half an egg, a very little flour, and a dust of pepper. Beat up two eggs, and after taking off the fish thicken it by stirring in the egg. Some let it boil after the egg is added, but if this is done the egg will be curdied.
Page 44 - ... far exceed in voracity those of the torrid zone. " In cold and temperate climates, the air, which incessantly strives to consume the body, urges man to laborious efforts, in order to furnish the means of resistance to its action, while, in hot climates, the necessity of labour to provide food is far less urgent.
Page 9 - Cake batter is thrown out because but little is left. Cold puddings are considered good for nothing, when often they can be steamed for the next day, or, as in case of rice, made over in other forms. Vegetables are thrown away that would warm for breakfast nicely.
Page 44 - ... supply of oxygen. In the animal body the food is the fuel ; with a proper supply of oxygen we obtain the heat given out during its oxidation or combustion. In winter, when we take exercise in a cold atmosphere, and when consequently the amount of inspired oxygen increases, the necessity for food containing carbon and hydrogen increases in the same ratio ; and by gratifying the appetite thus excited, we obtain the most efficient protection against the most piercing cold. A starving man is soon...
Page 44 - We should then also be able to take the same quantity of brandy or train oil without bad effects, because the carbon and hydrogen of these substances would only suffice to keep up the equilibrium between the external temperature and that of our bodies. According to the preceding expositions, the quantity of food is regulated by the number of respirations, by the temperature of the air, and by the amount of heat given off to the surrounding medium.
Page 10 - ... loses the cork and the flies take possession; vinegar is drawn in a basin and allowed to stand until both basin and vinegar are spoiled; sugar is spilled from the barrel, coffee from the sack, and tea from the chest. Different sauces are made too sweet, and both sauce and sugar are wasted; dried fruit has not been taken care of in season, and becomes wormy; the vinegar on pickles loses strength or leaks out, and the pickles become soft; potatoes in the cellar grow, and the sprouts are not removed...
Page 10 - ... table linen is thrown carelessly down, and is eaten by mice, or put away damp and is mildewed; or the fruit stains are forgotten, and the stains washed in; table-cloths and napkins used as dish-wipers: mats forgotten to be put under hot dishes; tea-pots melted by the stove; water forgotten in pitchers, and allowed to freeze in winter ; slops for...

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