Socioeconomic Status, Parenting, and Child Development

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Marc H. Bornstein, Robert H. Bradley
Taylor & Francis, Dec 13, 2002 - Psychology - 304 pages
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Socioeconomic Status, Parenting, and Child Development presents cutting-edge thinking and research on linkages among socioeconomic status, parenting, and child development. The contributors represent an array of different disciplines, and approach the issues from a variety of perspectives. Accordingly, their "take" on how SES matters in the lives of children varies.

This volume is divided into two parts. Part I concerns the constructs and measurement of SES and Part II discusses the functions and effects of SES. Each part presents four substantive chapters on the topic followed by an interpretive and constructively critical commentary.

The chapters--considered as a whole--attest to the value of systematically examining the components of SES and how each flows through an array of specific parenting practices and resources both within and outside the home environment to help shape the course of child development. The result is a more fully delineated picture of how SES impacts the lives of children in the 21st century--a picture that contains a road map for the next generation of studies of SES and its role in the rapidly evolving ecology of family life.

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About the author (2002)

Marc H. Bornstein serves as Senior Investigator and Head of Child and Family Research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Editor of Parenting: Science and Practice. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University, and has since focused on studying aspects of cognitive, emotional, and language development across the lifespan and on parent-child relationships in cross-cultural contexts. He has held academic appointments at several prestigious universities around the world, including Princeton University, New York University, University College London, and the Sorbonne. Dr. Bornstein is the author of several hundred articles on infant development and parent-child relationships as well as the textbooks Development in Infancy and Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook.

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