Pigs in Heaven: Novel, A (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Mar 17, 2009 - Fiction - 384 pages
1618 Reviews

A phenomenal bestseller and winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Award for fiction, Pigs in Heaven continues the story of Taylor and Turtle, first introduced in The Bean Trees.

  

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5 stars
458
4 stars
625
3 stars
391
2 stars
106
1 star
38

You gotta love happy endings! - Goodreads
Weak on the research even for fiction... - Goodreads
I love her simple writing that has amazing depth. - Goodreads
Author's character development is excellent. - Goodreads
It's full of sweet wisdom and insight. - Goodreads
The ending is perhaps a tiny let down. - Goodreads

Review: Pigs in Heaven (Greer Family #2)

User Review  - Layla (Reading Shoes Blog) - Goodreads

I didn't immediately realize that this book is a sequel to Bean Trees, which I vaguely remember enjoying several years ago. Alas I couldn't really remember the plot of Bean Trees, but the back story ... Read full review

Review: Pigs in Heaven (Greer Family #2)

User Review  - Terri Padrick - Goodreads

Wow. A little book that includes The Trail of Tears, astronomy, and the culture of the Cherokee people living on land "given" to them by the government....while it certainly does not romanticize their ... Read full review

All 2 reviews »

Contents

Queen of Nothing
4
A Mean Eye
11
The True Stories
24
Lucky Buster Lives
31
The Secret of TV
45
Thieves of Children
51
A World of Free Breakfast
65
A More Perfect Union
73
Natural Systems
182
Chewing Bones
189
The War of the Birds and Bees
197
Skid Road
208
Welcome to Heaven
224
Secret Business
243
Wildlife Management
246
Picking
262

The Pigs in Heaven
83
The Horses
95
Someone the Size of God
112
The Twilight Zone of Humanity
129
The Church of Risk and Hope
141
Fiat
151
Communion
157
Marooned
163
Treasure
171
Old Flame
271
Family Stories
284
Surrender Dorothy
298
The Secret of Creation
310
Six Pigs and One Mother
316
Hen Apples
327
The Snake Ukten
334
The Gambling Agenda
346
Copyright

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Page 4 - WOMEN ON THEIR OWN RUN in Alice's family. This dawns on her with the unkindness of a heart attack and she sits up in bed to get a closer look at her thoughts, which have collected above her in the dark. It's early morning, April, windless, unreasonably hot even at this sun-forsaken hour. Alice is sixty-one. Her husband, Harland, is sleeping like a brick and snoring. To all appearances they're a satisfied couple sliding home free into their golden years, but Alice knows that's not how it's going to...
Page 340 - Ray, and of course you [Alice, her mother], and Mattie, my boss at the tire store, all those people as my family. But when you never put a name on things, you're just accepting that it's okay for people to leave when they feel like it.
Page 92 - right by your people or you'll be a pig in heaven.
Page 4 - To all appearances they're a satisfied couple sliding home free into their golden years, but Alice knows that's not how it's going to go. She married him two years ago for love, or so she thought, and he's a good enough man but a devotee of household silence. His idea of marriage is to spray WD-40 on anything that squeaks.
Page 92 - Yes. I had a hundred and one childhood myths, and they all added up more or less to 'Do right by your people.
Page 8 - The garden Alice wishes she could abandon is crowded with bird music and border disputes and other people's hungry animals.
Page 99 - In the last few days Taylor has been noticing images of Indians everywhere: the Indian-chief profile on a Pontiac. The innocentlooking girl on the corn-oil margarine. The hook-nosed cartoon mascot of the Cleveland Indians, who played in Tucson.
Page 94 - It's impossible. Your definitions of 'good' are not in the same dictionary.

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About the author (2009)

Barbara Kingsolver's work has been translated into more than twenty languages and has earned a devoted readership at home and abroad. She was awarded the National Humanities Medal, our country's highest honor for service through the arts. She received the 2011 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for the body of her work, and in 2010 won Britain's Orange Prize for The Lacuna. Before she made her living as a writer, Kingsolver earned degrees in biology and worked as a scientist. She now lives with her family on a farm in southern Appalachia.

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