Japan in the 21st Century: Environment, Economy, and Society

Front Cover
University Press of Kentucky, 2005 - History - 401 pages

Kentucky's first settlers brought with them a dedication to democracy and a sense of limitless hope about the future. Determined to participate in world progress in science, education, and manufacturing, Kentuckians wanted to make the United States a great nation. They strongly supported the War of 1812, and Kentucky emerged as a model of patriotism and military spirit.

Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War offers a new synthesis of the sixty years before the Civil War. James A. Ramage and Andrea S. Watkins explore this crucial but often overlooked period, finding that the early years of statehood were an era of great optimism and progress. Drawing on a wealth of primary and secondary sources, Ramage and Watkins demonstrate that the eyes of the nation often focused on Kentucky, which was perceived as a leader among the states before the Civil War. Globally oriented Kentuckians were determined to transform the frontier into a network of communities exporting to the world market and dedicated to the new republic. Kentucky Rising offers a valuable new perspective on the eras of slavery and the Civil War.

This book is a copublication with the Kentucky Historical Society.

 

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Contents

Grappling with Changes
1
2 Environmental Challenges and Constraints
9
3 The Cultural Heritage
50
4 Japanese Landscapes
77
5 Regional Reality
109
6 Demographic and Social Challenges
164
7 Rural Landscape Settlements and Agriculture
204
8 Urban Settlements
236
10 The Economic Challenge
312
11 Development and Restructuring of Industry
323
12 Postindustrial Japan
342
13 The Challenge of Environmental Preservation
359
14 Facing the Challenges
376
Further Readings
387
Index
393
Copyright

9 The Political Challenge
284

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About the author (2005)

Pradyumna P. Karan is professor of geography and Japan studies at the University of Kentucky.

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