Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain

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Pan, 2001 - Political Science - 430 pages
3 Reviews
A devastating indictment of the corruption at the heart of the British State by one of our most popular media figures.George Monbiot made his name exposing the corruption of foreign governments; now he turns his keen eye on Britain. In the most explosive book on British politics of the new decade, Monbiot uncovers what many have suspected but few have been able to prove: that corporations have become so powerful they now threaten the foundations of democratic government.Many of the stories George Monbiot recounts have never been told before, and they could scarcely be more embarrassing to a government that claims to act on behalf of all of us. Some are - or should be - resigning matters. Effectively, the British government has collaborated in its own redundancy, by ceding power to international bodies controlled by corporations. CAPTIVE STATE highlights the long term threat to our society and ultimately shows us ways in which we can hope to withstand the might of big business.

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User Review  - the.ken.petersen - LibraryThing

IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THIS BOOK, THEN SHAME UPON YOU. Have you ever noticed the sanctity of the reformed smoker? He/she is always the first to cough, grimace and make disapproving noises when some ... Read full review

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User Review  - swadeson - LibraryThing

Presents an interesting perspective with a lot of case studies - too many or too much detail for my liking. The case studies just went on and on and became quite tiresome. Yea I know, there's an ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

George Monbiot has been named by The Evening Standard as one of the twenty-five most influential people in Britain and by The Independent on Sunday as one of the forty international prophets of the twenty-first century. He is the author of Captive State: The corporate Takeover of Britain, and the investigative travel books, Poisoned Arrows, Amazon Watershed and No Man's Land. He writes a column for The Guardian and is Honorary Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Keele, and Visiting Professor at the Department of Environmental Science, University of East London.

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