Battles in Culpeper County, Virginia, 1861-1865: And Other Articles, Volume 21

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Exponent Printing Office, 1900 - Culpeper County (Va.) - 56 pages
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Page 2 - Wilderness can still be traced; and on the eastern verge of which stand the grass-grown batteries of Fredericksburg. Northward, beyond the woods which hide the Rapidan, the eye ranges over the wide and fertile plains of Culpeper, with the green crest of Slaughter Mountain overlooking Cedar Run, and the dim levels of Brandy Station, the scene of the great cavalry battle,* just visible beyond. Far away to the northeast the faint outline of a range of hills marks the source of Bull Run and the Manassas...
Page 8 - ... reviewing officers, and knew that the eyes of the great Robert E. Lee were upon him. The column moved at a walk until it came within some fifty or one hundred paces of the position occupied by the reviewing general, when squadron by squadron would take up first the trot, then the gallop, until they had passed some distance beyond, when again they would pull down to the walk. After passing in review, the several brigades were brought again to the position which they occupied in the line, whence...
Page 2 - It was still unknown to history, a peaceful and pastoral district, remote from the beaten tracks of trade and travel, and inhabited by a quiet and industrious people. Today there are few regions which boast sterner or more heroic memories. To the right, rolling away in light and shadow for a score of miles, is the great forest of Spotsylvania, within whose gloomy depths lie the fields of Chancellorsville, where the breastworks of the Wilderness can still be traced; and on the eastern verge of which...
Page 2 - The view from the summit embraced an extensive landscape. The ravages of war had not yet effaced its tranquil beauty, nor had the names of its bright rivers and thriving villages become household words. It was still unknown to history, a peaceful and pastoral district, remote from the beaten tracks of trade and travel, and inhabited by a quiet and industrious people.
Page 10 - Union cavalry followed up their advantage, charging into and beyond the village, to the Barbour house, in pursuit of the fugitives. The gallant Col. Hampton, son of Gen. Hampton, was mortally wounded in the fights near the village, and quite a number of others wounded or taken prisoners. After awhile. Cols. Wickham and Butler succeeded in rallying the most of their commands, and reformed on the north side of Mountain Run, on the Beckham farm. The section of artillery was put in position, and the...
Page 4 - Huntington (Dr. Dan'l. Green's), and came out by the Barbour house to Brandy Station. He gives, in his report, a very interesting account of his trip, of the route pursued, of the beauty and fertility of the country, and the temper of the people with whom he met. He speaks of the country as lovely in its appearance, well cultivated, and filled with supplies of all sorts, for man and beast. That most of the farmers had left their homes in charge of their overseers, but'that their farming work was...
Page 23 - ... was that the Federals, under the protection of their guns, succeeded in forcing the passage of the river, and capturing nearly all of the Confederate pickets at that point. Rhodes...
Page 13 - Confederates, on the other band, had from the very beginning of the war, used their cavalry to the greatest advantage. This branch of the service seemed to suit the genius and spirit of our people, and it was brought to a state of efficiency with wonderful rapidity. The victories which crowned the Confederate arms for the first years of the war, were due, in a great measure, to the skillful manner in which the Confederate generals, Stuart and Ashby, maneuvered their cavalry, and concealed the movements...
Page 5 - ... last two had but recently joined the cavalry service. At the outbreak of the war they were students at the University of Virginia, but they laid aside their books, and joined the "Culpeper Minute Men," 3rd. Va. infantry, in which they served till discharged in the spring of 1862. The elder, William, was a young man of some twenty-two or twenty-three years of age, tall and well developed, with a bright and cheery disposition, and altogether, one of the handsomest young men we ever knew. The younger,...
Page 40 - Church, and drove them beyond that point. The fight continued during the night, and at daylight this morning he turned their left and routed them. When they reached Reams...

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