The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

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R. Bentley, 1879 - Battles - 407 pages
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Review: The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Creasy makes interesting choices that could be debated. He is somewhat uneven in the coverage and description of the battles, a fact probably largely influenced by the historical record. And he ... Read full review

Review: The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

User Review  - Justin - Goodreads

You can tell a Victorian Englishman wrote this book because he interjects comments with that worldview: that the British Empire is the best, the sun will never set on it, and that it is the ultimate ... Read full review

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Page 339 - Last noon beheld them full of lusty life, Last eve in Beauty's circle proudly gay, The midnight brought the signal-sound of strife, The morn the marshalling in arms — the day Battle's magnificently stern array...
Page 339 - And Ardennes waves above them her green leaves, Dewy with , nature's tear-drops as they pass, Grieving, if aught inanimate e'er grieves, Over the unreturning brave, — alas! Ere evening to be trodden like the grass...
Page 339 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed. The mustering squadron, and the clattering car. Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war; And the deep thunder peal on peal afar; And near, the beat of the alarming drum Roused up the soldier ere the morning star; While thronged the citizens with terror dumb. Or whispering with white lips — "The foe! They come! they come ! " And wild and high the "Cameron's gathering
Page 229 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman ; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too ; and think foul scorn that Parma, or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm...
Page 339 - Ah ! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress, And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness ; And there were sudden partings, such as press The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs Which ne'er might be repeated...
Page 229 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.
Page 118 - Then leave the poor Plebeian his single tie to life — The sweet, sweet love of daughter, of sister, and of wife, The gentle speech, the balm for all that his vexed soul endures, The kiss, in which he half forgets even such a yoke as yours. Still let the maiden's beauty swell the father's breast with pride ; Still let the bridegroom's arms enfold an unpolluted bride.
Page 310 - Burgoyne to Great Britain, upon condition of not serving again in North America during the present contest...
Page 285 - Westward the course of empire takes its way ; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day — Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 310 - This article is inadmissible in any extremity. Sooner than this army will consent to ground their arms in their encampments, they will rush on the enemy determined to take no quarter.

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