Long Heads and Round Heads; Or, What's the Matter with Germany

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A.C. McClurg & Company, 1918 - Ethnology - 157 pages
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Page 151 - Curse ye Meroz, said the angel of the Lord, curse ye bitterly the inhabitants thereof; because they came not to the help of the Lord, to the help of the Lord against the mighty.
Page 97 - The wrong— I speak openly— the wrong we thereby commit we will try to make good as soon as our military aims have been attained. He who is menaced as we are and is fighting for his highest possession can only consider how he is to hack his way through (durchhauen).
Page 118 - Remember that you are a chosen people. The spirit of the Lord has descended upon me because I am the Emperor of the Germans. I am the instrument of the Almighty, I am his sword, his agent. Woe and death to those who shall oppose my will. Woe and death to those who do not believe in my mission. . . . Let them perish, all the enemies of the German people! God demands their destruction, God who, by my mouth, bids you to do His will.
Page 35 - These immigrants adopt the language of the native American, they wear his clothes, they steal his name and they are beginning to take his women...
Page 103 - Whoever cannot prevail upon himself to approve from the bottom of his heart the sinking of the Lusitania — whoever cannot conquer his sense of the gigantic cruelty [ungeheure Grausamkeit] to unnumbered innocent victims — and give himself up to honest delight at this victorious exploit of German defensive power — him we judge to be no true German.
Page 84 - ... the nation the demoniacal obsession of power-worship and world-dominion, to modify and pervert the mentality — indeed the very fibre and moral substance — of the German people, a people which until misled, corrupted and systematically poisoned by the Prussian ruling caste, was and deserved to be an honored, valued and welcome member of the family of nations.
Page 87 - German-American, so called, who, in this sacred war for a cause as high as any for which ever people took up arms, does not feel a solemn urge, does not show an eager determination, to be in the very forefront of the struggle ; does- not prove a patriotic jealousy, in thought, in action, and in speech, to rival and to outdo his nativeborn fellow citizen in devotion and in willing sacrifice for the country of his choice and adoption and sworn allegiance, and of their common affection and pride. As...
Page 78 - I must try to prove that war is not merely a necessary element in the life of nations, but an indispensable factor of culture, in which a true civilized nation finds the highest expression of strength and vitality.
Page 81 - ... another we must square our account with France if we wish for a free hand in our international policy. This is the first and foremost condition of a sound German policy, and since the hostility of France once for all cannot be removed by peaceful overtures, the matter must be settled by force of arms. France must be so completely crushed that she can never again come across our path.
Page 78 - Efforts directed toward the abolition of war are not only foolish, but absolutely immoral, and must be stigmatized as unworthy of the human race.

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