Odious Commerce: Britain, Spain and the Abolition of the Cuban Slave Trade

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 12, 2002 - Business & Economics - 440 pages
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The Atlantic slave trade brought to Cuba the African slaves who created the dramatic transformation of the island from a relative backwater of Spain's colonial empire in the mid-eighteenth century to the world's richest plantation colony one hundred years later. Britain played a vital role in this transformation. British slave traders were the chief suppliers of Cuba's slaves in the eighteenth century; in the nineteenth century Britain became the greatest threat to Cuba's prosperity when she attempted to make Spain follow her example and abolish the slave trade. Dr Murray's study, based on a thorough examination of British and Spanish records, reveals how important British influence was on the course of Cuban history.
 

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Contents

The opening of a legal trade
1
Parliament versus Cortes
22
Legality and illegality
40
The treaty of 1817
50
Enforcement and reenforcement the attempt to make the slave trade prohibition effective
72
The treaty of 1835
92
An abolitionist era
114
The Turnbull affair
133
Free trade and annexationism
208
The failure of the penal law
241
A new class of slaves
271
The abolition of the Cuban slave trade
298
Abbreviations
327
Notes
328
Bibliography
400
Index
415

The Escalera conspiracy
159
The penal law of 1845
181

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About the author (2002)

David Murray is the director of research at the Statistical Assessment Service (STATS). He has written articles for dozens of publications, including the "Wall Street Journal", "Washington Post", "Christian Science Monitor", & "Roll Call" & has appeared on various shows on the History Channel, CNN, NBC, ABC, & NPR. He lives in the Washington, DC metro area.

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