The history of British Guiana: comprising a general description of the colony ; a narrative of some of the principal events from the earliest period of its discovery to the present time ; together with an account of its climate, geology, staple products, and natural history

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1855 - Guyana
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Page 507 - Under present circumstances, so gloomy is the condition of affairs here,* that the two gentlemen whom your commissioners have examined with respect to this district, both concur in predicting " its slow but sure approximation to the condition in which civilized man first found it.
Page 142 - The following circumstance is still more remarkable, and illustrates, in a singular manner, the care of God over his servants. Being one evening attacked with a paroxysm of fever, he resolved to go into his hut and lie down in his hammock. Just, however, as he entered the door, he beheld a serpent descending from the roof upon him. In the scuffle which ensued, the creature bit him in three different places ; and, pursuing him closely, twined itself several times round his head and neck as tightly...
Page 506 - The abandoned plantations on this coast,* which, if capital and labor could be procured, might easily be made very productive, are either wholly deserted, or else appropriated by hordes of squatters, who of course are unable to keep up at their own expense the public roads and bridges; and consequently all communication by land between the Corentyne and New Amsterdam is nearly at an end. The roads are impassable for horses or carriages, while for foot passengers they are extremely dangerous. The...
Page 504 - the once famous Arabian coast, so long the boast of the colony, presents now but a mournful picture of departed prosperity. Here were formerly situated some of the finest estates in the country, and a large resident body of proprietors lived in the district, and freely expended their incomes on the spot whence they derived them.
Page 21 - The town was illuminated when I landed, in consequence of the news of high prices from England. Three splendid trains of De Eosne's machinery, costing $40,000 each, had just arrived from France, and were in process of erection ; steam-engines and engineers were coming over daily from America ; new estates were forming ; coffee plantations were being broken up ; and their feeble gangs of old people and children who had hitherto been selected for that light work, were formed into task-gangs and hired...
Page 503 - Describing another portion of the colony — they say of one district, ' Unless a fresh supply of labor be very soon obtained, there is every reason to fear that it will become completely abandoned.' Of a. second, 'speedy immigration alone can save this island from total ruin.' 'The prostrate condition of this once beautiful part of the coast,' are the words which begin another paragraph, describing another tract of country.
Page 20 - 1 spent," says that intelligent witness, " the beginning of this year in Cuba, with a view of ascertaining the preparations which were being made in that island to meet the opening of our markets. To an Englishman coming up from Grenada and Jamaica, the contrast between the paralysed and decayed aspect of the trade of those colonies, and the spirit anH activity which your measures had infused into that of the Havannab, was most disheartening.
Page 180 - Full-sized and well-filled bunches give 60 per cent, of core to 40 of husk and top-stem, but in general it would be found that the core did not much exceed 50 per cent., and the fresh core will yield 40 per cent, of dry meal, so that from 20 to 25 per cent, of meal is obtained from the plantain ; or 5 Ibs. from an average bunch of 25 Ibs...
Page 496 - It would be but a melancholy task to dwell upon the misery and ruin which so alarming a change must have occasioned to the proprietary body; but your commissioners feel themselves called upon to notice the effects which this wholesale abandonment of property has produced upon the colony at large. Where whole districts are fast relapsing into bush, and occasional patches of provisions around the huts of village settlers are all that remain to tell of once flourishing estates, it is not to be wondered...
Page 504 - The prostrate condition of this once beautiful part of the coast,' are the. words- which begin another paragraph, describing another tract of country. Of a fourth, ' the proprietors on this coast seem to be keeping up a hopeless struggle against approaching ruin.' Again, 'the once famous Arabian coast, so long the boast of the colony, presents now but a mournful picture of departed prosperity. Here were formerly situated some of the finest estates in the country, and a large resident body of proprietors...

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