A Book of Winter Sports: An Attempt to Catch the Spirit of the Keen Joys of the Winter Season

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J. C. Dier
Macmillan, 1912 - Winter sports - 351 pages
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Page 61 - All this time, Mr Winkle, with his face and hands blue with the cold, had been forcing a gimlet into the soles of his feet, and putting his skates on, with the points behind, and getting the straps into a very complicated and entangled state, with the assistance of Mr Snodgrass, who knew rather less about skates than a Hindoo. At length, however, with the assistance of Mr Weller, the unfortunate...
Page 63 - Not much," said Mr. Winkle, rubbing his back very hard. " I wish you 'd let me bleed you," said Mr. Benjamin, with great eagerness. " No, thank you," replied Mr. Winkle, hurriedly. " I really think you had better," said Allen. "Thank you," replied Mr. Winkle; "I'd rather not." " What do you think, Mr. Pickwick ?" inquired Bob Sawyer. Mr. Pickwick was excited and indignant. He beckoned to Mr. Weller, and said, in a stern voice, " Take his skates off !" "No ; but really I had scarcely begun,
Page 63 - You're wery good, sir," replied Mr. Weller. "Just hold me at first, Sam; will you?" said Mr. Winkle. " There — that's right. I shall soon get in the way of it, Sam. Not too fast, Sam ; not too fast.
Page 131 - An' hungered maukin ta'en her way To kail-yards green, While faithless snaws ilk step betray Whare she has been. The thresher's weary flingin-tree The lee-lang day had tired me ; And whan the day had closed his e'e, Far i' the west, Ben i' the spence, right pensivelie, I gaed to rest.
Page 24 - ... church spire, sleeping with his fathers, and vexing his soul with poetry no more. Mark has covered him now with a fair Portland slab. He took Claude Mellot to it this winter before church time, and stood over it long with a puzzled look, as if dimly discovering that there were more things in heaven and earth than were dreamed of in his philosophy. "Wonderful fellow he was, after all! Mary shall read us out some of his verses to-night. But, I say, why should people be born clever, only to make...
Page 61 - Weller having shoveled and swept away the snow which had fallen on it during the night, Mr. Bob Sawyer adjusted his skates with a dexterity which to Mr. Winkle was perfectly...
Page 62 - Yes, yes," replied Mr. Winkle, with a ghastly smile. " I'm coming." "Just a goin' to begin," said Sam, endeavoring to disengage himself. " Now, sir, start off ! " " Stop an instant, Sam," gasped Mr. Winkle, clinging most affectionately to Mr. Weller.- " I find I've got a couple of coats at home that I don't want, Sam. You may have them, Sam.
Page 64 - No ; but really I had scarcely begun," remonstrated Mr. Winkle. "Take his skates off," repeated Mr. Pickwick firmly. The command was not to be resisted. Mr. Winkle allowed Sam to obey it, in silence. " Lift him up,
Page 336 - ... and which is achieved by skimming over the ice on one foot, and occasionally giving a twopenny postman's knock upon it, with the other.
Page 60 - I like to see it so much." " Oh, it is so graceful," said another young lady. A third young lady said it was elegant, and a fourth expressed her opinion that it was

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