1921: The Great Novel of the Irish Civil War

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Macmillan, Mar 15, 2002 - Fiction - 560 pages
2 Reviews
The Irish fight for independence is one of the most captivating tales of the twentieth century. Morgan Llywelyn, the acclaimed historical writer of books like Lion of Ireland, Bard and The Horse Goddess, is the writer born to bring this epic battle to life. Having created an entire body of work chronicling the Celts and Ireland, she now turns to recent Irish history to create a multivolume saga: The Irish Century.

1921 tells the story of the Irish War of Independence and the heartbreaking civil war that followed. Henry Mooney, a reporter for theClare Champion and the Irish Bulletin, is a self-described "moderate nationalist" who struggles to see the truth in the news of the day, and to report it fairly. Lacking more radical Republican beliefs of his dear friends Ned Halloran and Sile Duffy, Henry reports the political--and later, bloody--actions of his fellow Irishman from the ashes of the failed 1916 Rising to the creation of the Irish Free State to the tragic and wide-ranging battles of the Irish Civil War.

Meanwhile, Henry feels the impact of these history-changing events in his own personal life. His friendship with Ned falters when their political beliefs diverge, and an unexpected tragedy leaves them further apart than ever. Henry struggles with his passion for a well-bred Protestant Anglo-Irish woman, Ella Rutledge, and as he dutifully reports the events in the political battle for independence, he comes to realize that the Irish struggle for freedom wil leave no life untouched--and no Irish citizen with a dry eye or an untroubled heart.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Hagelstein - LibraryThing

Llywelyn mixes fiction with a large dose of fact and history in this novel of the struggle for Irish independence. The fictional journalist Henry Mooney rubs shoulders with Michael Collins, Eamon de ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KendraRenee - LibraryThing

A long historical fiction novel that didn't win me over right away. I felt like her style was a little choppy/awkward, and her characters somewhat underdeveloped. The farther I read, though, the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter One
1
Chapter Two
6
Chapter Three
17
Chapter Four
29
Chapter Five
35
Chapter Six
45
Chapter Seven
51
Chapter Eight
62
Chapter Twentyseven
254
Chapter Twentyeight
264
Chapter Twentynine
281
Chapter Thirty
291
Chapter Thirtyone
310
Chapter Thirtytwo
320
Chapter Thirtythree
334
Chapter Thirtyfour
350

Chapter Nine
67
Chapter Ten
72
Chapter Eleven
76
Chapter Twelve
86
Chapter Thirteen
90
Chapter Fourteen
98
Chapter Fifteen
107
Chapter Sixteen
115
Chapter Seventeen
122
Chapter Eighteen
128
Chapter Nineteen
138
Chapter Twenty
151
Chapter Twentyone
164
Chapter Twentytwo
175
Chapter Twentythree
193
Chapter Twentyfour
208
Chapter Twentyfive
225
Chapter Twentysix
241
Chapter Thirtyfive
356
Chapter Thirtyseven
374
Chapter Thirtyeight
390
Chapter Thirtynine
399
Chapter Forty
403
Chapter Fortyone
416
Chapter Fortytwo
430
Chapter Fortythree
444
Chapter Fortyfour
456
Chapter Fortyfive
469
Chapter Fortysix
476
Chapter Fortyseven
487
Chapter Fortyeight
494
Bibliography
509
Lion of Ireland
519
Chapter One
521
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Since 1980 Morgan Llywelyn has created an entire body of work chronicling the Celts and Ireland, from the earliest times to the present day. her critically acclaimed novels, both of history and of mythology, have been translated into many languages. She is an Irish citizen and lives in Dublin.

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