Erasmus: A Study of His Life, Ideals and Place in History

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Harper & Brothers, 1923 - Humanists - 479 pages
 

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Page 422 - Stemmed the wild torrent of a barb'rous age, And drove those holy Vandals off the stage.
Page 323 - In short, when I consider the question, whether there are such persons in the world as those we call witches, my mind is divided between the two opposite opinions, or rather (to speak my thoughts freely) I believe in general that there is, and has been such .a thing as witchcraft; but at the same time can give no credit to any particular instance of it.
Page 63 - When I hear my Colet, I seem to be listening to Plato himself. In Grocyn who does not marvel at such a perfect round of learning ? What can be more acute, profound, and delicate than the judgment of Linacre ? What has Nature ever created more gentle, more sweet, more happy than the genius of Thomas More ? I need not go through the list.
Page 303 - Do you count it a mean employment to imbue the minds of your fellow citizens in their earnest years with the best literature and with the love of Christ, and to return them to their country honest and virtuous men? In the opinion of fools it is a humble task, but in fact it is the noblest of occupations.
Page 200 - LET any one turn over the pages of ancient or modern history: scarcely in several generations will you find one or two princes whose folly has not inflicted the greatest misery on mankind. I know not whether much of this is not to be imputed to ourselves. We trust the rudder of a vessel, where a few sailors and some goods alone are in jeopardy, to none but skillful pilots, but the State, wherein the safety of so many thousands is concerned, we put into any hands.
Page 353 - This is the acme of faith, to believe that God who saves so few and condemns so many is merciful ; that he is just who at his own pleasure has made us necessarily doomed to damnation, so that...
Page 352 - The human will is like a beast of burden. If God mounts it, it wishes and goes as God wills ; if Satan mounts it, it wishes and goes as Satan wills. Nor can it choose the rider it would prefer, nor betake itself to him, but it is the riders who contend for its possession.
Page 303 - ... love of Christ, and to return them to their country honest and virtuous men? In the opinion of fools it is a humble task, but in fact it is the noblest of occupations. Even among the heathen it was always a noble thing to deserve well of the State, and no one serves it better than the moulders of raw boys.
Page 93 - Then he (Tyndale) asketh me why I have not contended with Erasmus, whom he calleth my darling, of all this long while, for translating of this word ecclesia into this word congregatio.
Page 210 - I am persuaded that without knowledge of literature pure theology cannot at all endure, just as heretofore, when letters have declined and lain prostrate, theology, too, has wretchedly fallen and lain prostrate; nay, I see that there has never been a great revelation of the Word of God unless He has first prepared the way by the rise and prosperity of languages and letters, as though they were John the Baptists...

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