St. Nicholas, Volume 36

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Scribner & Company, 1909 - Children's periodicals
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Page 316 - The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who'll git me a book I ain't read.
Page 411 - Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou comest in such a questionable shape That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane: O, answer me!
Page 583 - CLEAN, WHOLE WHEAT is separated into kernel and outer — or bran-coat: the first containing the tissuemaking and energy-storing elements — the second, "vital" phosphates for rebuilding tissue-cells. The kernel is SKILFULLY ROASTED to a degree that develops an aroma similar to Java coffee (but without coffee or any drug-like substance); hence the delicious flavour of Postum, which has led many to think they were drinking coffee. The roasted kernels are then COOLED AND GROUND. The roasting has changed...
Page 217 - In 1908 it was still possible for an American children's magazine to carry a story in which a teenage girl writes a love poem in honor of her female schoolmate, declaring: My love has a forehead broad and fair, And the breeze-blown curls of her chestnut hair Fall over it softly, the gold and the red A shining aureole round her head. Her clear eyes gleam with an amber light For sunbeams dance in them swift and bright And over those eyes so golden brown, Long, shadowy lashes droop gently down . . ....
Page 316 - He could not afford to waste paper upon his original compositions. He would sit by the fire at night and cover the wooden shovel with essays and arithmetical exercises, which he would shave off and then begin again. It is touching to think of this...
Page 317 - In those days many men, clergymen, judges, and lawyers, rode on circuit, stopping over night at any farmhouse they might happen upon. When such a man would ride up to the Lincoln clearing he was usually met by a small boy who would fire questions at him before he could dismount from his horse.
Page 317 - Abe, learn all you can, and grow up to be of some account. You 've got just as good Virginia blood in you as George Washington had." Abe did not forget that. Soon after the family moved to Pidgeon Creek his mother died, and a little later a stepmother took her place. This woman soon learned that the boy was not the ordinary type, and kept encouraging him to make something of himself. She was always ready to listen -when he read, to help him with his lessons...
Page 13 - go bad' about the tenth year of life; tigers two or three years earlier. The male tiger is the dread of the profession when he reaches this condition, because he is more likely to go into a frenzy without warning, and once gone bad, nothing will satisfy him but murder.
Page 317 - You've got just as good Virginia blood in you as George Washington had." Abe did not forget that. Soon after the family moved to Pidgeon Creek his mother died, and a little later a stepmother took her place. This woman soon learned that the boy was not the ordinary type, and kept encouraging him to make something of himself. She was always ready to listen when he read, to help him with his lessons, to cheer him. When he got too old to wear his bearskin suit she told him that if he would earn enough...
Page 316 - Not a bad list of books if taken seriously and not mixed with trash; for, of course, culture has to do not so much with the extent of the information as with the depth of the impression. The youthful Lincoln pondered also over the Revised Statutes of Indiana; and "he would sit in the twilight and read a dictionary as long as he could see.

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