A Manual of Coaching

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J.B. Lippincott, 1901 - Coaching - 579 pages
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Page 11 - FIVE-AND-THIRTY years ago the glory had not yet departed from the old coach-roads : the great roadside inns were still brilliant with well-polished tankards, the smiling glances of pretty barmaids, and the repartees of jocose ostlers ; the mail still announced itself by the merry notes of the horn ; the hedgecutter or the rick-thatcher might still know the exact hour by the unfailing yet otherwise meteoric apparition of the pea-green Tally-ho...
Page 414 - ... corded silk plush, made to button over the calf of the leg, with sixteen strings, and rosettes to each knee ; the boots very short, and finished with very broad straps, which...
Page 476 - Both in riding and driving along ; If you go to the left you are sure to go right, If you go to the right you go wrong...
Page 508 - ... should be of carpet or any other suitable material, not leather. The inside of the coach is usually finished in hard wood or leather. The coachman's driving apron, when not in use, should be folded on the driving cushion, outside out. A foot-board watch with case should be provided. The driving cushion should have a pocket on the near side. The iron rails on the roof, between the front and back seats, should have a lattice or network of leather straps to prevent small luggage, coats, rugs, etc.,...
Page 535 - NIMROD'S northern tour, descriptive of the principal hunts in Scotland and the north of England ; with the tabletalk of distinguished sporting characters, and anecdotes of masters of hounds, crack riders and celebrated amateur dragsmen. [By Charles James APPERLEY.] London : 1838. Octavo.* NINA. A tale for the twilight. By S. M., author of " The story of a family," " The maiden aunt," " The use of sunshine,
Page 127 - We now come to one of the divisions of our subject important from a practical point of view — the position of the center of gravitv of the coach. The center of gravity of a body is that part in which its whole weight may be considered as concentrated; in a symmetrical body of equal thickness and equal density in all its parts it is at the center of the figure of the body. For example, a square piece of board of even thickness will have its center of gravity at the point at which its two diagonals...
Page 508 - The door of the hind boot should be hinged on the off side, to enable the guard to open it from the near hind step when the coach is in motion. The skid and safety hook must be hung on the off side in countries in which it is customary to drive on the off side of the roadway ; for the skid should be on the outside wheel, or the coach will slide toward the ditch. The trimming of the outside seats should be of carpet or any other suitable material, not leather. The inside of the coach is usually finished...
Page 6 - Edinburgh, every other Tuesday, and meet at Burrow-bridge on Saturday night, and set out from thence on Monday morning, and get to London and Edinburgh on Friday. In...
Page 128 - ... of the centre of gravity from the plane of motion at the end of that time. When the forward swinging leg reaches the ground at the end of each step, it must be in a condition to receive the falling trunk, and be prepared to project it from the ground, to swing again in the air ; for this purpose the centre of gravity must be in the vertical line passing through the head of the thigh-bone and foot ; for if the centre fell behind this line, the runner would fall backwards ; and if before it, he...
Page 534 - ANNALS of the ROAD ; Or, Notes on Mail and Stage Coaching in Great Britain. By CAPTAIN MALET, 18th Hussars. To which are added, Essays on the Road, by NIMROD.

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