The death of Attila

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Knopf, 1973 - Fiction - 273 pages
3 Reviews
A strange bond unites a young Hun soldier and the son of a German chief during Attila's invasion of Gaul.

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User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

This is a very literary novel, and there's more interior rumination than action. I'm not impressed with mood conveyed, and the local colour is nearly non-existent. Avoid unless you do like the philosophical content of Cecilia Holland. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

Story of an adolescent Gothic boy who befriends a Hun towards he end of ttila's reign; they go on a mission in the Roman empire together, but after Attila dies they end p fighting on opposite sides in ... Read full review


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About the author (1973)

Born in Henderson, Nevada, Cecelia Holland was educated at Pennsylvania State University and Connecticut College, where she received her B.A. degree. She has served as a visiting professor of English at Connecticut College since 1979. Holland's historical novels have received broad critical acclaim. According to one critic, she "proves that there can be more to historical thrillers than swordplay and seduction." (Time) Among her novels is City of God (1979), which is set in Rome during the period of the Borgia family. Told from the point of view of Nicolas, a secretary to the Florentine ambassador to Rome, this novel brings to life the period of the Renaissance, including the political intrigue that characterized Rome at the time. Other works include Until the Sun Falls (1969), a story of the ancient Mongols and their empire, The Firedrake (1966), her first published novel, Great Maria (1974), The Bear Flag (1990), and Pacific Street (1991). Holland is very adept at capturing the period she writes about, including the clothing, furnishings, and customs of the time. One critic has noted that Holland "is never guilty of the fatuity which plagues most historical fiction: she never nudges the reader into agreeing that folks way back then were really just like you and me, only they bathed less often.

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