The Last Spaceship

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Wildside Press LLC, Oct 1, 2006 - Fiction - 132 pages
7 Reviews
Kim Rendall will not yield to the tyranny of the power-madrulers of Alphin III. Branded an outlaw, he is in danger of psychological torture worse than death from the Disiplinary Circuit, which keeps the masses in check.

His one hope lies in the Starshine, an outmoded spaceship. In a world where teleportation is the norm, no one travels by interstellar vessel anymore. Rendall plans to use the Starshine to save his girlfriend and himself -- and possibly his entire planet!

 

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User Review  - usnmm2 - LibraryThing

From the start of the "golden age" of science fiction. The story has not held up and would only be of interest to the person who's interested in science fiction literary history. Read full review

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1981 grade B Read full review

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Analog Science Fiction and Fact is an American science fiction magazine. As of 2013, it is the longest running continuously published magazine of that genre. Initially published in 1930 in the United States as Astounding Stories as a pulp magazine, it has undergone several name changes, primarily to Astounding Science-Fiction in 1938, and Analog Science Fact & Fiction in 1960. In November 1992, its logo changed to use the term "Fiction and Fact" rather than "Fact & Fiction." It is in the library of the International Space Station. Spanning three incarnations since 1930, this is perhaps the most influential magazine in the history of the genre. It remains a fixture of the genre today. As Astounding Science-Fiction, a new direction for both the magazine and the genre under editor John W. Campbell was established. His editorship influenced the careers of Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein, and also introduced the Dianetics theories of L. Ron Hubbard in May 1950.Analog frequently publishes new authors, including then-newcomers such as Orson Scott Card and Joe Haldeman in the 1970s, Harry Turtledove, Timothy Zahn, Greg Bear, and Joseph H. Delaney in the 1980s, and Paul Levinson, Michael A. Burstein, and Rajnar Vajra in the 1990s. One of the major publications of what fans and historians call the Golden Age of Science Fiction and afterward, it has published much-reprinted work by such major SF authors as E.E. Smith, Theodore Sturgeon, Harlan Ellison, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, A. E. van Vogt, Lester del Rey, HP Lovecraft and many others. This is an excerpt from the article Astounding Stories of Super Science from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia.

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