Ovid Renewed: Ovidian Influences on Literature and Art from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century

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Charles Martindale
CUP Archive, Jul 27, 1990 - Literary Criticism - 332 pages
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This book is a study of Ovid and his poetry as a cultural phenomenon, conceived in the belief that such a study of tradition also casts fresh light on Ovid himself. Its main concern is with exploring the influence of Ovid on literature, especially English literature, but it also takes a wider perspective, including, for example, the visual arts. The book takes the form of a series of studies by specialists in their fields, including a number of scholars of international renown. The essays cover the period from the twelfth century, when there was an upsurge of interest in Ovid, through to the decline in his fortunes in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They are critical and comparative in approach and collectively give a detailed sense of Ovid's importance in Western culture. Topics covered include Ovid's influence on Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare and his contemporaries, Dryden, T. S. Eliot, the myths of Daedalus and Icarus and Pygmalion, and the influence of Ovid's poetry on art.
 

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Contents

Daedalus and Icarus i From Rome to the end of the Middle
21
Daedalus and Icarus ii From the Renaissance to the present
37
Ovid the Crusader
55
a question of authority
71
metamorphoses in The Faerie Queene
99
Ovid and the Elizabethans
121
the reflected self
137
Illustrating Ovid
151
Dryden and Ovids Wit out of season
167
The Heroides and the English Augustans
191
Some versions of Pygmalion
205
Ovid and The Waste Land
233
Appendix
247
Bibliography
286
Plates between 288 and
289
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