The Pilgrim's Regress

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Eerdmans Publishing Company, Jan 10, 1992 - Religion - 219 pages
31 Reviews
The first book written by C. S. Lewis after his conversion, The Pilgrim's Regress is, in a sense, the record of Lewis's own search for meaning and spiritual satisfaction -- a search that eventually led him to Christianity.

Here is the story of the pilgrim John and his odyssey to an enchanting island which has created in him an intense longing 7mdash; a mysterious, sweet desire. John's pursuit of this desire takes him through adventures with such people as Mr. Enlightenment, Media Halfways, Mr. Mammon, Mother Kirk, Mr. Sensible, and Mr. Humanist and through such cities as Thrill and Eschropolis as well as the Valley of Humiliation.

Though the dragons and giants here are different from those in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Lewis's allegory performs the same function of enabling the author to say simply and through fantasy what would otherwise have demanded a full-length philosophy of religion.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wisewoman - LibraryThing

The Pilgrim's Regress, first published in 1933, was C. S. Lewis's first book after becoming a Christian. It is a fiercely personal allegory of one man's search for the beauty he glimpses faintly from ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jjvors - LibraryThing

In some ways this is a double allegory; it is an allegory of C.S. Lewis' spiritual journey to Christianity and it is an allusive allegory to Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. Whereas Bunyan's book shows a ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

(1898-1963) He held the chair of Medieval and Renaissance English Literature at Cambridge University in England. Among his many famous works are Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, the Chronicles of Narnia series, Miracles, The Abolition of Man, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, and Surprised by Joy.

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