The Cotton States in the Spring and Summer of 1875

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D. Appleton, 1876 - History - 112 pages
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Page 18 - ... rude sports and a rude agriculture, they are a peculiar people. They have more good qualities than their wealthier neighbors, the planters, always allow them; but they are ignorant, easily prejudiced, and they have, since the war, lived in a dread of having social equality with the negro imposed upon them. This fear has bred hatred of the blacks, which has often, in former years, found expression in brutal acts, to which, I believe, in the majority of cases, they were instigated by bad menof...
Page 78 - State [Mississippi] do not discourage the practice of carrying arms as they should ; they are astonishingly tolerant of acts which would arouse a Northern community to the utmost, and I believe that to this may be ascribed all that is bad in Mississippi — to an almost total lack of a right public opinion.
Page 47 - ... and that a perpetual injunction issue commanding them and all the defendants to refrain from setting up or claiming any right, title, or interest under said sale or under said deed, and also commanding them, their agents and servants, to refrain from...
Page 13 - ... and reassure the blacks. Such manifestations of power strike the imaginations of the negroes, as they would an ignorant population, and they follow very readily and blindly its possessor. Some colored witnesses in Alabama, being asked why they all voted against Sheats for Congress, replied: "Because Perrin told them to." Being asked if they would have voted the Democratic ticket if Perrin had told them to, they answered unhesitatingly: "Yes.
Page 60 - ... impoverishing our own people ; second, to establish a solvent and reliable home institution for the sale of lottery, policy and...
Page 70 - The planters, without exception, so far as I have heard them speak, are thoroughly satisfied with the colored man as a laborer. I do not mean to say that they have no fault to find; but they say that the negroes are orderly, docile, faithful to their engagements, steady laborers in the field, readily submitting to directions and instructions, and easily managed and made contented. This applies to cotton as well as sugar planters, and all is summed up in the phrase I most frequently heard used, "We...
Page 79 - It was that summer that Charles Nordhoff, traveling in Mississippi, wrote of Ames, that 'his personal adherents are among the worst public thieves. . . . He has corrupted the courts, has protected criminals, and has played even with the lives of the blacks in a manner that, if this fall a good Legislature should be elected, ought to procure his impeachment and removal.
Page 60 - articles of incorporation," which declare, among other things : "The objects of and purposes of this corporation are — First, the protection of the state against the great losses heretofore incurred by sending large amounts of money to other states and foreign countries, for the purchase of lottery tickets and devices, thereby impoverishing our own people...
Page 47 - Home's mission and of the plan he was instructed to carry out. It is impossible to characterize this agreement as anything else than fraudulent. Its obvious purpose was to remove competition at the sale. It was a flagrant breach of trust on the part of Home, and it was a fraud in Ludeling, with knowledge of the trust Home had undertaken, to persuade him to violate his instructions and sacrifice the interests of his constituents, himself becoming a party to the violation. Such were the combinations...
Page 29 - ... the arts have been advanced; the old Statehouse looks as dilapidated as when the reconstruction began, and has been changed in nothing except having its door-lintels mutilated that a Brooks cannon might be squeezed into the hall; the schools are almost all closed because the school fund was stolen; and Little Rock is unpaved, though the conquerors of 1868 issued nearly shinplasters enough to pave all the streets handsomely with the paper itself, and bonds enough besides to make dry crossings...

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