The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in the Global Economy

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 9, 1992 - Business & Economics - 219 pages
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The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe are moving away from a centrally planned economy toward integration within the global economy. How did this transition begin? Is this an aim which all the countries can afford? What conditions are to be met so that the countries will achieve a level of development comparable with the average level of their industrial partners? In this 1992 volume, leading international political economists from both the East and West provide an in-depth analysis of these questions. The contributors assess how the transition to the market requires liberalizing foreign trade, introducing convertibility, and transforming property structures, all of which are also part of the ongoing domestic reform. They also examine how these countries overcome their development lag and implement a restructuring policy.
 

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Contents

EastWest European integration
7
what is it good for?
23
US interests in granting most favored nation status to the
37
New developments in economic relations between Japan and
60
Features and trends of East Germanys aid and trade with the
86
EastWest technology transfer and Soviet regional
105
recent developments and
125
from concessions
133
Current joint venture law and its impact on the Polish
147
interests and experiences of
163
Perestroika and the new international economy
179
the
190
Between two fires? Foreign economic relations of Eastern
205
Index
217
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