Child Development From Infancy to Adolescence: An Active Learning Approach

Front Cover
SAGE Publications, Dec 16, 2014 - Psychology - 760 pages

This exciting chronological introduction to child development employs the lauded active learning approach of Laura E. Levine and Joyce Munsch’s successful topical text, inviting students to forge a personal connection to the latest topics shaping the field, including neuroscience, diversity, culture, play, and media. Using innovative pedagogy, Child Development From Infancy to Adolescence: An Active Learning Approach reveals a wide range of real-world applications for research and theory, creating an engaging learning experience that equips students with tools they can use long after the class ends.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Detailed Contents
ISSUES THEORY AND RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Why Study Childhood?
Careers in Child Development?
For Rick with love and appreciation
Contexts of Development
Being a Smart Consumer of Information About Development
Question Common Sense
Chapter 10 Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood
The Self in Preschoolers
Development of Gender Identity
The Role of the Environment
Family Relationships
Peer Relationships and the Role of Play
8
Risks Resources and Resilience

Conclusion
Chapter 2 Theory and Research in Development
Research Methods
Genes and Environment
TaySachs Disease
Behavioral Genetics
Chapter Summary
Chapter 4 Prenatal Development Birth and the Newborn
Health and Risks in Pregnancy
The Birth Experience
The Transition to Parenthood
Parenthood
Genes and Environment
Chapter 5 Physical Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood
Sensation and Perception
Smell
Infant Body Growth and Motor Development
Chapter Summary
Chapter 5 Physical Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood
Chapter 6 Cognitive Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood
The Debate About Object
Categorization
Aspects of Language
4
8
Threats to and Supports for Cognitive and Language
Chapter 6 Cognitive Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood
Development
Behaviorism and Social Cognitive Theory
Temperament
The Self in Infants and Toddlers
Contexts of Development
Promoting Cognitive and Language Development
EARLY CHILDHOOD
Chapter 8 Physical Development in Early Childhood
Checklist of Motor Skill
Brain Development
3
5
3
Child Maltreatment
Conclusion
7
Vygotskys Sociocultural Theory of Cognitive Development
Cognitive Processes
Executive Function
Language Development in Early Childhood
Reading Writing and Arithmetic
Risk Factors and Supports for Cognitive and Language
Starting School
Chapter Summary
MIDDLE CHILDHOOD
Development of Motor Skills
Brain Development
Obesity and Overweight
Physical Activity
The Role of the Family in Promoting Physical Activity
Organized Sports
Conclusion
Chapter 11 Physical Development in Middle Childhood
Chapter 12 Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood
Language Development in Middle Childhood
Intelligence
Cognitive Deficits and Intellectual Gifts
Chapter Summary
Chapter 12 Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood
Chapter 13 Social and Emotional Development in Middle Childhood
Attachment as a Relationship
Emotional Development and Emotional Problems
3
Family Relationships
Childrens Living Arrangements
Media
Chapter Summary
Chapter 13 Social and Emotional Development in Middle Childhood
Schizophrenia
Teens and Sexuality
Health and Nutrition During Adolescence
Stress and Coping in Adolescence
Stress
Chapter 14 Physical Development in Adolescence
Chapter 15 Cognitive Development in Adolescence
Cognitive Processes
5
The Language of Teenagers
Positive Youth Development
Chapter 15 Cognitive Development in Adolescence
Chapter 16 Social and Emotional Development in Adolescence
Emotions
Sources of ParentAdolescent
Peer Relationships
Peers
Important Nonparental Adults
Emerging Adulthood
Chapter 16 Social and Emotional Development in Adolescence
Glossary
References
Chapter 7 Social and Emotional Development in Infancy
Health and Nutrition
Author Index
Subject Index
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)

Laura E. Levine received her PhD in developmental and clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. After working with children and families at the Children’s Psychiatric Hospital and in private practice in Ann Arbor for 10 years, she moved to Connecticut and was a stay-at-home mother of her two children for 6 years. She returned to academia in 1994 and taught child psychology and life span development for 20 years at Central Connecticut State University, where she is currently a professor emerita of the Department of Psychological Science. She has received three university teaching awards, and her research on the social development of young children and on the relation between media use and attention difficulties has appeared in journals such as Developmental Psychology, the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Infant Mental Health Journal, Infant and Child Development, Computers and Education, and CyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

Dr. Levine has been very active in promoting excellence in college teaching. She was involved in the creation of the Center for Teaching Excellence at Central Connecticut State University and served on the board of the Connecticut Consortium to Enhance Learning and Teaching. She created numerous programs for faculty both at her university and at regional and national conferences. Her work on the scholarship of teaching and learning can be found in New Directions for Teaching and Learning, College Teaching and the International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Joyce Munsch received her PhD in human development and family studies from Cornell University. She was a faculty member in human development and family studies at Texas Tech University for 14 years, where she also served as associate dean for research in the College of Human Sciences for 2 years. In 2002, Dr. Munsch went to the California State University at Northridge as the founding chair and professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Development. She currently is an emeritus professor in the Department.

Dr. Munsch’s research has focused on adolescent stress and coping and social network research. Her work has been published in the Journal of School Psychology, Adolescence, The Journal of Early Adolescence, the Journal of Research on Adolescence, and the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. Throughout her career, Dr. Munsch administered grants that supported community-based programs. She was the codirector of the Early Head Start program at Texas Tech University and co–principal investigator for three Texas Youth Commission (Department of Juvenile Justice) grants. At Cal State Northridge, she administered the Jumpstart program for over 10 years. Her commitment to community service learning was recognized in 2005 when she was awarded the CSUN Visionary Community Service Learning Award. In 2012, her service to the County of Los Angeles was recognized by a commendation from the County Board of Supervisors. At Texas Tech, she was the College of Human Sciences nominee for the Hemphill-Wells New Professor Excellence in Teaching Award, the Barnie E. Rushing Jr. Faculty Distinguished Research Award, the El Paso Energy Foundation Faculty Achievement Award, and the President’s Excellence in Teaching Award, and she received the Kathryn Burleson Faculty Service Award and the College of Human Sciences Outstanding Researcher Award.

Bibliographic information